The Americas

If returned to office, Brazil's Rousseff favors new election

  • Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff speaks during a press conference for foreign journalists at the Planalto residential palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, June 14, 2016. Rousseff blasted the impeachment process against her as "fraudulent" and promised to fight what she characterized as an injustice more painful than the torture she endured under a past military dictatorship. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff speaks during a press conference for foreign journalists at the Planalto residential palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, June 14, 2016. Rousseff blasted the impeachment process against her as "fraudulent" and promised to fight what she characterized as an injustice more painful than the torture she endured under a past military dictatorship. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff speaks during a press conference for foreign journalists at the Planalto residential palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, June 14, 2016. Rousseff blasted the impeachment process against her as "fraudulent" and promised to fight what she characterized as an injustice more painful than the torture she endured under a past military dictatorship. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff speaks during a press conference for foreign journalists at the Planalto residential palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, June 14, 2016. Rousseff blasted the impeachment process against her as "fraudulent" and promised to fight what she characterized as an injustice more painful than the torture she endured under a past military dictatorship. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff speaks during a press conference for foreign journalists at the Planalto residential palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, June 14, 2016. Rousseff blasted the impeachment process against her as "fraudulent" and promised to fight what she characterized as an injustice more painful than the torture she endured under a past military dictatorship. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff speaks during a press conference for foreign journalists at the Planalto residential palace, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, June 14, 2016. Rousseff blasted the impeachment process against her as "fraudulent" and promised to fight what she characterized as an injustice more painful than the torture she endured under a past military dictatorship. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff says she would favor new elections to help Latin America's largest nation emerge from political crisis.

In an interview Tuesday night with foreign news agencies, Rousseff said she would first have to survive an upcoming trial in which senators will decide whether to permanently remove her from office.

Rousseff says the country is experiencing a political "weariness" that has to be overcome.

In her words, "If there needs to be new elections, I would be in favor."

Rousseff was impeached and suspended by the Senate last month for allegedly using fiscal tricks to hide yawning gaps in the federal budget. Rousseff has repeatedly denied wrongdoing.