San Francisco's 'Poop Patrollers' cleaning up -- on the streets and at the bank

San Francisco has assigned six city workers to a new "Poop Patrol" to rid targeted sidewalks of human waste -- but it turns out the pay is far from crappy.

"Poop patrollers" earn $71,760 a year, which swells to a value of $184,678 with mandated benefits, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

The paper reported Wednesday that the city has earmarked $830,977 in taxpayer dollars for the new unit.

SAN FRANCISCO CREATES 'POOP PATROL' TO CLEAN UP CITY'S FECES-RIDDEN SIDEWALKS

The sight of human waste, discarded hypodermic needles, trash and general grime is nothing new to anyone walking in any number of San Francisco neighborhoods, according to the Chronicle.

“We’re spending a lot of money to address this problem,” Mayor London Breed said.

A team of five Public Works employees and a supervisor will begin patrolling the alleys around Polk Street and other hot spots in about a month, the Chronicle reported last week.

SAN FRANCISCO INTRODUCES 'POOP PATROL' TO CLEAN UP AFTER ITS OWN CRAPPY LIBERAL POLICIES

The city’s 311 service has received nearly 14,600 calls about piles of poop, other human waste and dog feces since the beginning of the year.

The new "Poop Patrol" is part of the city’s Pit Stop program, which also provides staffed public toilets around the downtown areas.