US

California conservative flees to Texas, hopes others join him

Are you a conservative who’s found yourself increasingly surrounded by liberals? Well, relocation to Collin County in the Red State of Texas may be just what you need to blow away your Blue State blues.

A company called Conservative Move says its aim is to help conservatives find the kind of lifestyle that suits them best. “Helping families move Right,” is the company’s slogan.

Founder Paul Chabot, 43, is a former Californian who recently told the Los Angeles Times that he and his family moved to McKinney, Texas, north of Dallas, after he became disheartened watching his native San Bernardino County become less and less conservative and more and more liberal.

“In California, it’s like the liberals can do no wrong,” Chabot told the newspaper. “No matter what we (conservatives) do, we’re beating our heads against the wall.”

After losing his bid to win California’s 31st Congressional District seat last November, Chabot and his wife, Brenda, decided that the Golden State no longer seemed to have room for anyone who was a “pro-life, pro-family, pro-faith conservative Republican.”

So far Chabot’s company hasn’t attracted any serious clients, but he has received more than 1,000 inquiries, the Times reported. Emails from frustrated California conservatives seem to echo Chabot’s own yearnings to live among more like-minded people.

“My boys’ minds have been taken over by the liberal teachings of the schools here,” a woman from Westlake Village, California, wrote to Chabot, according to the Times.

“Conservative views here are silenced,” wrote another woman, from Perris, California.

But living in Collin County, Chabot told the Times, is “like living a dream.”

Instead of the graffiti and gangs of California, he’s now surrounded by new homes, malls and golf courses – and taxes are lower.

But the Times notes that a rise in corporate relocations to north Texas has also brought more Democrats to the area. And it says Donald Trump took only 56 percent of the vote in Collin County in 2016, compared with 65 percent for Mitt Romney in 2012.

“There may be a fair number of conservatives who come here and say, ‘I like this much better than California,” Mike Rawlins, chairman of the Collin County Democratic Party told the Times. “But that’s a drop in the bucket. Ten or 20 years from now, they’re going to find out they don’t like it as much as they do now.”