Police and Law Enforcement

NYPD starts body-camera program for dozens of police

The unit is fully staffed 24/7, 365 days a year, citywide

 

Some police officers in New York City will start wearing body cameras on Thursday.

58 officers in a Washington Heights precinct will begin wearing the cameras as part of a new pilot program, according to Newsday. Officials have already completed training sessions with the officers, all of whom were preselected to utilize the equipment.

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A total of 60 cameras have been provided to the precinct.

The move is part of a larger program in which 1,200 devices will be deployed in 20 commands in the city, with the next one scheduled for the 60th Precinct in South Brooklyn near Sheepshead Bay.

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The plan is to have all 22,000 patrol cops in the city equipped with the devices by 2020.

The program derived from a federal court decision in 2013. That case argued that the police department’s use of stop-and-frisk procedures was unconstitutional. 

One fix for the issue, according to Judge Shira Scheindlin, was to experiment with body camera use by police in order to both provide a new method of accountability and as a way to ease tensions between police and the community.

The current camera pilot program follows a smaller run in 2014 in which 54 officers wore the devices.

A special court-appointed NYPD monitor will be reviewing the city’s compliance with the proposed resolutions and will be assessing the new camera program.