Tennessee

Immigrant tuition break gaining support in Tennessee

  • FILE - In this April 22, 2015, file photo, supporters of a bill to extend in-state tuition to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally signal their position on a motion from the well of the House chamber in Nashville, Tenn. From right are Reps. Mark White, R-Memphis; Joe Towns, D-Memphis, and Harry Brooks, R-Knoxville. A deeply conservative state, Tennessee voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration. And yet, Republican lawmakers are pushing a proposal that would allow public colleges to offer in-state tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig, File)

    FILE - In this April 22, 2015, file photo, supporters of a bill to extend in-state tuition to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally signal their position on a motion from the well of the House chamber in Nashville, Tenn. From right are Reps. Mark White, R-Memphis; Joe Towns, D-Memphis, and Harry Brooks, R-Knoxville. A deeply conservative state, Tennessee voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration. And yet, Republican lawmakers are pushing a proposal that would allow public colleges to offer in-state tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this April 22, 2015, file photo, supporters of a bill to extend in-state tuition to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally signal their position on a motion from the well of the House chamber in Nashville, Tenn. From right are Reps. Mark White, R-Memphis; Joe Towns, D-Memphis, and Harry Brooks, R-Knoxville. A deeply conservative state, Tennessee voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration. And yet, Republican lawmakers are pushing a proposal that would allow public colleges to offer in-state tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig, File)

    FILE - In this April 22, 2015, file photo, supporters of a bill to extend in-state tuition to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally signal their position on a motion from the well of the House chamber in Nashville, Tenn. From right are Reps. Mark White, R-Memphis; Joe Towns, D-Memphis, and Harry Brooks, R-Knoxville. A deeply conservative state, Tennessee voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration. And yet, Republican lawmakers are pushing a proposal that would allow public colleges to offer in-state tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig, File)  (The Associated Press)

A deeply conservative state, Tennessee voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration.

And yet, some Republican lawmakers are pushing a proposal that would allow public colleges to offer in-state tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally.

If the lawmakers succeed, Tennessee would follow the lead of Washington, D.C., the only other local government to pass such an ordinance since Trump took office in January. Twenty other states already allow the in-state tuition, including about a half-dozen that tilt Republican.