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The Latest: State officials to discuss travel ban lawsuits

  • Halima Mohamed, embraces her daughter Muzamil Shalle, 14, left, as her other daughter Miski Shalle, 11, center, approaches, she sees her children for the first time in seven years at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. The parents, who are from Somalia, but have been living in Mechanicsburg, Pa., were originally scheduled to receive the children earlier this year, but the process was delayed due to a security check expiring as a result of delayed travel caused by the Jan. 27, 2017, White House travel ban executive order. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

    Halima Mohamed, embraces her daughter Muzamil Shalle, 14, left, as her other daughter Miski Shalle, 11, center, approaches, she sees her children for the first time in seven years at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. The parents, who are from Somalia, but have been living in Mechanicsburg, Pa., were originally scheduled to receive the children earlier this year, but the process was delayed due to a security check expiring as a result of delayed travel caused by the Jan. 27, 2017, White House travel ban executive order. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)  (The Associated Press)

  • Ismail Issack, left, follows his family, from left, Muzamil Shalle, 14, wife Halima Mohamed, and Miski Shalle, 11, as they leave John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York Wednesday, March 8, 2017, after the parents were reunited with the daughters for the first time in seven years. The parents, who have been living in Mechanicsburg, Pa., were originally scheduled to receive the children earlier this year, but the process was delayed due to a security check expiring as a result of delayed travel caused by the Jan. 27, 2017, White House travel ban executive order. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

    Ismail Issack, left, follows his family, from left, Muzamil Shalle, 14, wife Halima Mohamed, and Miski Shalle, 11, as they leave John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York Wednesday, March 8, 2017, after the parents were reunited with the daughters for the first time in seven years. The parents, who have been living in Mechanicsburg, Pa., were originally scheduled to receive the children earlier this year, but the process was delayed due to a security check expiring as a result of delayed travel caused by the Jan. 27, 2017, White House travel ban executive order. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)  (The Associated Press)

  • Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson, right, arrives for a news conference about the state's response to President Trump's revised travel ban with Solicitor General Noah Purcell, left, and Civil Rights Unit Chief Colleen Melody, Thursday, March 9, 2017, in Seattle. Legal challenges against Trump's revised travel ban mounted Thursday as Washington state said it would renew its request to block the executive order. It came a day after Hawaii launched its own lawsuit, and Ferguson said both Oregon and New York had asked to join his state's legal action. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson, right, arrives for a news conference about the state's response to President Trump's revised travel ban with Solicitor General Noah Purcell, left, and Civil Rights Unit Chief Colleen Melody, Thursday, March 9, 2017, in Seattle. Legal challenges against Trump's revised travel ban mounted Thursday as Washington state said it would renew its request to block the executive order. It came a day after Hawaii launched its own lawsuit, and Ferguson said both Oregon and New York had asked to join his state's legal action. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on Hawaii's lawsuit challenging the revised travel ban (all times local):

7:40 a.m.

Officials from two states that have filed legal challenges against President Donald Trump's travel bans plan to discuss their lawsuits later Thursday.

Separate news conferences are planned Thursday by Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin in Honolulu and Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson in Seattle.

Hawaii on Wednesday became the first state to sue the administration over its revised travel ban. The executive order, which goes into effect March 16, bars new visas for people from six predominantly Muslim countries and temporarily shuts down the U.S. refugee program. It doesn't apply to travelers who already have visas.

Hawaii says the order will harm its Muslim population, tourism and foreign students.

A federal judge in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order halting Trump's initial travel ban order after Washington state and Minnesota sued. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that decision.