MILITARY

On foreign policy, Trump still speaking campaign language

In this Feb. 2, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump speaks during his meeting with House and Senate legislators in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. For all of the White House's early bravado,Trump has taken office with few concrete plans for how to make good on his pledge to unravel President Barack Obama's foreign policy and tackle some of the biggest national security challenges facing his administration. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

In this Feb. 2, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump speaks during his meeting with House and Senate legislators in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. For all of the White House's early bravado,Trump has taken office with few concrete plans for how to make good on his pledge to unravel President Barack Obama's foreign policy and tackle some of the biggest national security challenges facing his administration. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)  (The Associated Press)

For all the White House's early bravado, President Donald Trump has few concrete plans for making good on key foreign policy and national security promises.

In phone calls with European leaders, Trump is said to have described his plans for confronting the Islamic State group with the same hard-charging but vague rhetoric he used while campaigning.

The new president has been pressed about how he plans to pursue a better relationship with Russia, but he sticks with his public assertion that a better relationship with Moscow would be beneficial for the West. That's according to U.S. officials and others with knowledge of Trump's discussions.

Trump's use of vague language in private discussions has left allies and administration officials uncertain whether he has policies in mind to back up his rhetoric.