RELIGION

Veterans protest travel ban, saying it hurts interpreters

  • In this 2010 photo provided by U.S. Army Capt. Matthew Ball shows his interpreter Qismat Amin, second seated from left, in Jalalabad, the capital of Nangarhar province of Afghanistan. Amin, who has been living in hiding after getting threats from Taliban and Islamic state fighters, got his visa Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, after nearly four years of interviews. Ball bought him a $1,000 plane ticket to San Francisco and plans to meet him at the airport with an attorney. Ball said he has bought a plane ticket for his Afghan translator in case that country is added to the list of banned nations. ( U.S. Army Capt. Matthew Ball via AP)

    In this 2010 photo provided by U.S. Army Capt. Matthew Ball shows his interpreter Qismat Amin, second seated from left, in Jalalabad, the capital of Nangarhar province of Afghanistan. Amin, who has been living in hiding after getting threats from Taliban and Islamic state fighters, got his visa Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, after nearly four years of interviews. Ball bought him a $1,000 plane ticket to San Francisco and plans to meet him at the airport with an attorney. Ball said he has bought a plane ticket for his Afghan translator in case that country is added to the list of banned nations. ( U.S. Army Capt. Matthew Ball via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Army Capt. Matthew Ball conducts an interview at the Stanford University law school Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, in Stanford, Calif. Ball said his interpreter Qismat Amin, who has been living in hiding after getting threats from Taliban and Islamic state fighters, got his visa Sunday, after nearly four years of interviews. Ball bought him a $1,000 plane ticket to San Francisco and plans to meet him at the airport with an attorney. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Army Capt. Matthew Ball conducts an interview at the Stanford University law school Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, in Stanford, Calif. Ball said his interpreter Qismat Amin, who has been living in hiding after getting threats from Taliban and Islamic state fighters, got his visa Sunday, after nearly four years of interviews. Ball bought him a $1,000 plane ticket to San Francisco and plans to meet him at the airport with an attorney. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)  (The Associated Press)

  • Army Capt. Matthew Ball poses for a portrait at the Stanford University law school Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, in Stanford, Calif. Ball said his interpreter Qismat Amin, who has been living in hiding after getting threats from Taliban and Islamic state fighters, got his visa Sunday, after nearly four years of interviews. Ball bought him a $1,000 plane ticket to San Francisco and plans to meet him at the airport with an attorney. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Army Capt. Matthew Ball poses for a portrait at the Stanford University law school Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, in Stanford, Calif. Ball said his interpreter Qismat Amin, who has been living in hiding after getting threats from Taliban and Islamic state fighters, got his visa Sunday, after nearly four years of interviews. Ball bought him a $1,000 plane ticket to San Francisco and plans to meet him at the airport with an attorney. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)  (The Associated Press)

U.S. combat veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan say they are outraged at the ban on immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries and the suspension of the U.S. refugee program that has blocked visas for interpreters who risked their lives to help American troops on the battlefield.

Thousands of veterans have signed letters. One soldier says he has bought a plane ticket for his Afghan translator in case that country is added to the list of banned nations.

Many veterans say they feel betrayed by the executive order that President Donald Trump signed Friday.

They say the fight feels personal since they gave their word to people who risked their lives to aid American troops that the United States would protect them and their families.

Trump has repeatedly said the move is aimed at protecting the nation against extremists looking to attack Americans and American interests.