Massachusetts

From Ukraine with love: Postcards pay tribute to war dead

  • In this Aug. 5, 2015 photo provided by Lucas Constanti, a postcard he received from Ukraine, which was sent as part of the "Welcome to Donetsk" postcard project, is displayed in Somerville, Mass. In hopes of putting a human face on war, Taylor-Lind and Alisa Sopova have been mailing such cards from eastern Ukraine to random people around the globe, informing the recipients that someone they had never met died in armed conflict there. (Lucas Constanti via AP)

    In this Aug. 5, 2015 photo provided by Lucas Constanti, a postcard he received from Ukraine, which was sent as part of the "Welcome to Donetsk" postcard project, is displayed in Somerville, Mass. In hopes of putting a human face on war, Taylor-Lind and Alisa Sopova have been mailing such cards from eastern Ukraine to random people around the globe, informing the recipients that someone they had never met died in armed conflict there. (Lucas Constanti via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this June 7, 2016 photo provided by Soumita Bhattacharya, Anastasia Taylor Lind discusses her postcard project "Welcome to Donetsk" at the International Centre of Photography New Media Narratives Conversations class in New York. In hopes of putting a human face on war, Taylor-Lind and Alisa Sopova have been mailing such cards from eastern Ukraine to random people around the globe, informing the recipients that someone they had never met died in armed conflict there. (Soumita Bhattacharya via AP)

    In this June 7, 2016 photo provided by Soumita Bhattacharya, Anastasia Taylor Lind discusses her postcard project "Welcome to Donetsk" at the International Centre of Photography New Media Narratives Conversations class in New York. In hopes of putting a human face on war, Taylor-Lind and Alisa Sopova have been mailing such cards from eastern Ukraine to random people around the globe, informing the recipients that someone they had never met died in armed conflict there. (Soumita Bhattacharya via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this July 16, 2015 photo provided by Anastasia Vlasova, Anastasia Taylor-Lind writes a postcard as part of her "Welcome to Donetsk" postcard project in Kiev, Ukraine. In hopes of putting a human face on war, Taylor-Lind and Alisa Sopova have been mailing such cards from eastern Ukraine to random people around the globe, informing the recipients that someone they had never met died in armed conflict there. (Anastasia Vlasova via AP)

    In this July 16, 2015 photo provided by Anastasia Vlasova, Anastasia Taylor-Lind writes a postcard as part of her "Welcome to Donetsk" postcard project in Kiev, Ukraine. In hopes of putting a human face on war, Taylor-Lind and Alisa Sopova have been mailing such cards from eastern Ukraine to random people around the globe, informing the recipients that someone they had never met died in armed conflict there. (Anastasia Vlasova via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Imagine opening your mailbox and finding a postcard from eastern Ukraine informing you that someone you've never met died in armed conflict there.

Two women are mailing such cards randomly to people around the globe to put a human face on war.

Anastasia Taylor-Lind launched the project in the summer of 2015, addressing postcards from Ukraine to total strangers. Each carries a cryptic handwritten message with the name of the person who died and the date that he or she perished.

The U.N. estimates nearly 10,000 people have died in Ukraine since 2014. So far, Taylor-Lind and another Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, Alisa Sopova, have sent 2,000 postcards to people in 60-plus countries.

They're driven by a desire to keep the memories of victims on all sides alive.