TERROR

McConnell: Congress should discuss fixes to 9/11 law

  • FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, firefighters make their way through the rubble after two airliners crashed into the World Trade Center in New York bringing down the landmark buildings. The White House lashed out at Congress on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, a day after Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly overrode President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill to allow families of the 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. The White House turned to mockery as top GOP leaders expressed buyer's remorse and vowed to fix the bill. (AP Photo/Shawn Baldwin/File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, firefighters make their way through the rubble after two airliners crashed into the World Trade Center in New York bringing down the landmark buildings. The White House lashed out at Congress on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, a day after Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly overrode President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill to allow families of the 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. The White House turned to mockery as top GOP leaders expressed buyer's remorse and vowed to fix the bill. (AP Photo/Shawn Baldwin/File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2016 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., second from left, standing with, from left, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, of Texas, listens to a question during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. The White House lashed out at Congress on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, a day after Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly overrode President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill to allow families of the 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. The White House turned to mockery as top GOP leaders expressed buyer's remorse and vowed to fix the bill. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2016 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., second from left, standing with, from left, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, of Texas, listens to a question during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. The White House lashed out at Congress on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, a day after Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly overrode President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill to allow families of the 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. The White House turned to mockery as top GOP leaders expressed buyer's remorse and vowed to fix the bill. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, firefighters make their way through the rubble after two airliners crashed into the World Trade Center in New York bringing down the landmark buildings. The White House lashed out at Congress on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, a day after Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly overrode President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill to allow families of the 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. The White House turned to mockery as top GOP leaders expressed buyer's remorse and vowed to fix the bill. (AP Photo/Shawn Baldwin/File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, firefighters make their way through the rubble after two airliners crashed into the World Trade Center in New York bringing down the landmark buildings. The White House lashed out at Congress on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, a day after Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly overrode President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill to allow families of the 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. The White House turned to mockery as top GOP leaders expressed buyer's remorse and vowed to fix the bill. (AP Photo/Shawn Baldwin/File)  (The Associated Press)

The Senate's top Republican is warning that legislation enacted over President Barack Obama's veto to allow families of Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts may have "unintended ramifications" and that lawmakers should discuss fixes to the measure.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the White House was too slow to warn about the "potential consequences" of the measure. Both the House and Senate overwhelmingly overrode Obama's veto of the measure on Wednesday.

Those concerned about the law warn that it could have a chilling effect on Saudi Arabia's cooperation with the U.S. in fighting terrorism. They also warn that it could trigger lawsuits from people in other countries seeking redress for injuries or deaths caused by military actions in which the U.S. may have had a role.