Vermont

Mormon church opposes plan for futuristic, green communities

  • Architectural engineer Ben Jensen displays plans for modular residential structure Friday, Aug. 19, 2016, in Provo, Utah. David Hall, a wealthy Mormon businessman has an ambitious plan to buy a Provo neighborhood and create a community of tiny, environmentally sustainable dwellings based on the teachings of church founder Joseph Smith. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

    Architectural engineer Ben Jensen displays plans for modular residential structure Friday, Aug. 19, 2016, in Provo, Utah. David Hall, a wealthy Mormon businessman has an ambitious plan to buy a Provo neighborhood and create a community of tiny, environmentally sustainable dwellings based on the teachings of church founder Joseph Smith. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)  (The Associated Press)

  • David Hall looks on during tour of a business Friday, Aug. 19, 2016, in Provo, Utah. Hall, a wealthy Mormon businessman has an ambitious plan to create communities in Utah and Vermont of tiny, environmentally sustainable dwellings based on the teachings of church founder Joseph Smith. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

    David Hall looks on during tour of a business Friday, Aug. 19, 2016, in Provo, Utah. Hall, a wealthy Mormon businessman has an ambitious plan to create communities in Utah and Vermont of tiny, environmentally sustainable dwellings based on the teachings of church founder Joseph Smith. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)  (The Associated Press)

The Mormon church says it doesn't support a wealthy Mormon businessman's push to build sustainable, futuristic communities near religious landmarks in Utah and Vermont inspired by founder Joseph Smith's plans from 1833.

Eric Hawkins, spokesman for The Church of Jesus Christ of Christ of Latter-day Saints, said in a statement this week that officials have concerns about the developments affecting existing neighborhoods and the longstanding relationships the religion has with those residents.

Developer David Hall is unfazed, saying he's not surprised by the opposition because he believes church leaders have never been forward-thinking.

Hall's plans are years away from reaching fruition in Utah and decades in Vermont.

But neighbors in both states already have expressed concerns about the communities drastically changing their areas.