US

Group deploys military veterans to volunteer in Detroit

  • Veterans Thomas Hart, left, and Damika Wallace work on building outdoor furniture at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Veterans Thomas Hart, left, and Damika Wallace work on building outdoor furniture at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)  (The Associated Press)

  • Veterans and volunteers unload supplies at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Veterans and volunteers unload supplies at the Beland Manning Park, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Hundreds of veterans are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)  (The Associated Press)

  • Veteran Jordan Daniel, left, and volunteers work on dismantling an old fence, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Daniel is one of hundreds of veterans who are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Veteran Jordan Daniel, left, and volunteers work on dismantling an old fence, Monday, June 27, 2016, in Detroit. Daniel is one of hundreds of veterans who are in the financially troubled city for a week to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources. It's the latest and largest effort undertaken by St. Louis-based The Mission Continues, which encourages and aids volunteerism by disabled and wounded veterans. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)  (The Associated Press)

Dozens of military veterans have come to Detroit, where they plan to spend five days helping to rebuild areas that have been neglected by poverty, crime and a lack of resources.

It's the latest — and largest — effort undertaken by St. Louis, Missouri-based The Mission Continues, a nonprofit that encourages and aids volunteerism by veterans.

Teams of volunteers fanned out Monday to three locations in a neighborhood on the northeast side of Detroit. At one of those, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran Ben Eichel (EYE'-kuhl) and others worked at a park to pick up trash, remove old fencing and build benches.

The 33-year-old from Denver says The Mission Continues allows him and his fellow vets to successfully "reintegrate in civilian society" and appeals to those who "want to do good."