Washington

Judge won't dismiss lawsuit on harsh interrogation

FILE - In this May 14, 2013, file photo, the Department of Justice headquarters building in Washington is photographed early in the morning. The Justice Department has signaled that it won’t try to block a lawsuit arising from the CIA’s harsh interrogation techniques, leaving the door open for a court challenge over tactics that have since been discontinued and widely discredited. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)

FILE - In this May 14, 2013, file photo, the Department of Justice headquarters building in Washington is photographed early in the morning. The Justice Department has signaled that it won’t try to block a lawsuit arising from the CIA’s harsh interrogation techniques, leaving the door open for a court challenge over tactics that have since been discontinued and widely discredited. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)  (The Associated Press)

A federal judge won't dismiss a lawsuit against two Washington state psychologists who helped design the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques.

The decision in Spokane on Friday means a continuation of the closely-watched case that will likely include secret information in the war on terror.

The American Civil Liberties Union sued James E. Mitchell and John "Bruce" Jessen last October on behalf of three former CIA prisoners.

The lawsuit alleges that the psychologists, despite having no expertise on al-Qaida, devised an interrogation program for the CIA that drew from 1960s experiments involving dogs and the theory of "learned helplessness."