EDUCATION

Schools to face incomplete data in new school year after Common Core testing problems

  • FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2015 file photo, Common Core opponents wave signs and cheer at a rally opposing Mississippi's continued use of the Common Core academic standards on the steps of the Capitol in Jackson, Miss.   Results for some of the states that participated in Common Core-aligned testing for the first time this spring are out, with overall scores higher than expected though still below what many parents may be accustomed to seeing.   (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis,File)

    FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2015 file photo, Common Core opponents wave signs and cheer at a rally opposing Mississippi's continued use of the Common Core academic standards on the steps of the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Results for some of the states that participated in Common Core-aligned testing for the first time this spring are out, with overall scores higher than expected though still below what many parents may be accustomed to seeing. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis,File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this April 30, 2015 file photo, Leticia Fonseca, 16, left, and her twin sister, Sylvia Fonseca, right, work in the computer lab at Cuyama Valley High School after taking the new Common Core-aligned standardized tests, in New Cuyama, Calif.   Test results for this year’s Common Core-aligned exams are starting to be released, and while several states report higher-than-expected scores, vast numbers of students didn’t test proficient in math or reading.(AP Photo/Christine Armario, File)

    FILE - In this April 30, 2015 file photo, Leticia Fonseca, 16, left, and her twin sister, Sylvia Fonseca, right, work in the computer lab at Cuyama Valley High School after taking the new Common Core-aligned standardized tests, in New Cuyama, Calif. Test results for this year’s Common Core-aligned exams are starting to be released, and while several states report higher-than-expected scores, vast numbers of students didn’t test proficient in math or reading.(AP Photo/Christine Armario, File)  (The Associated Press)

Last school year, Common Core-aligned standardized tests marched forward, going from paper-and-pencil to the computer.

But many states had technical issues with the electronic form and weren't able to complete the testing. Others saw an unprecedented spread of refusals.

That means this new school year is starting without complete testing data in many areas.

Officials say the incomplete data should have a minimal impact on students, teachers and districts. In most cases, it will be an inconvenient delay.

States most impacted say they don't expect testing problems next year.