TERROR

Army chaplain from Texas wins national prize to deliver 9/11 sermon at chapel by ground zero

FILE - In this June 25, 2015, file photo, the World Trade Center, right, looms behind St. Paul's Chapel with its steeple wrapped in scaffolding for repairs, in New York. The winner of a new competition open to people of all faiths called "The Reconciliation Preaching Prize," has been won by an Army chaplain from Austin, Texas. The Rev. David Peters will have the privilege of delivering an original sermon on Sept. 11, at the chapel near ground zero that was turned into a makeshift memorial shrine and became a place of rest and renewal for volunteers and responders, following the terrorist attacks that brought down the twin towers. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

FILE - In this June 25, 2015, file photo, the World Trade Center, right, looms behind St. Paul's Chapel with its steeple wrapped in scaffolding for repairs, in New York. The winner of a new competition open to people of all faiths called "The Reconciliation Preaching Prize," has been won by an Army chaplain from Austin, Texas. The Rev. David Peters will have the privilege of delivering an original sermon on Sept. 11, at the chapel near ground zero that was turned into a makeshift memorial shrine and became a place of rest and renewal for volunteers and responders, following the terrorist attacks that brought down the twin towers. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)  (The Associated Press)

An Army chaplain has won a national prize for an original sermon he'll be delivering on Sept. 11 at a chapel near ground zero.

The Rev. David Peters, of Austin, Texas, will give his winning sermon during a special service at St. Paul's Chapel.

Peters is a former Marine and says he entered the Reconciliation Preaching Prize contest because he realized how 9/11 has shaped his life.

The inaugural competition was launched by the Parish of Trinity Church, which includes St. Paul's Chapel.

The Episcopal chapel is directly across from the World Trade Center. It was unscathed during the attacks and became a place of rest and renewal for volunteers and responders.

The competition is open to people of all faiths. The parish hopes to offer the contest annually.