DISASTERS

The Latest on severe weather: Texas braces for renewed flooding from Tropical Storm Bill

  • This is the Weather Underground forecast for Tuesday, June 16, 2015, for the United States. Showers and thunderstorms will continue to be possible through the eastern and central United States. Some storms may be severe in the northern Plains and parts of the Northeast. Dry weather will continue along the West Coast. (Weather Underground via AP)

    This is the Weather Underground forecast for Tuesday, June 16, 2015, for the United States. Showers and thunderstorms will continue to be possible through the eastern and central United States. Some storms may be severe in the northern Plains and parts of the Northeast. Dry weather will continue along the West Coast. (Weather Underground via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Workers secure scaffolding around First United Methodist Church, on the bay in Corpus Christi, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, as Tropical Storm Bill begins to make landfall. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Workers secure scaffolding around First United Methodist Church, on the bay in Corpus Christi, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, as Tropical Storm Bill begins to make landfall. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)  (The Associated Press)

  • A statue of Jesus calming the sea titled "It is I" faces the bay and gulf, in Corpus Christi, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, as Tropical Storm Bill begins to make landfall. The National Hurricane Center in Miami says Tropical Storm Bill came ashore Tuesday morning in the area of Matagorda County, about 90 miles southwest of Houston.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    A statue of Jesus calming the sea titled "It is I" faces the bay and gulf, in Corpus Christi, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, as Tropical Storm Bill begins to make landfall. The National Hurricane Center in Miami says Tropical Storm Bill came ashore Tuesday morning in the area of Matagorda County, about 90 miles southwest of Houston. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)  (The Associated Press)

1 a.m. (CDT)

The eastern half of Texas is preparing for renewed flooding as Tropical Storm Bill approaches the Texas Gulf Coast.

The National Hurricane Center predicted the storm would make landfall Tuesday morning somewhere between Baffin Bay, south of Corpus Christi, and High Island, just up the coast from Galveston.

Galveston County officials already have directed voluntary evacuation of the low-lying Bolivar Peninsula, where Hurricane Ike wiped out most structures in 2008. School districts from Galveston to the Houston suburbs have canceled Tuesday's classes.

According to projections by the National Weather Service, parts of North Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma could get up to 9 inches of rain over the next five days, and Missouri could get more than 7.

The forecast follows historic rains and floods last month.