US

In Milwaukee, 2 men turning love of bobbleheads into museum and hall of fame

  • In this April 16, 2015,  photo, Phil Sklar, seated, and Brad Novak sit with some of the bobbleheads they have collected since quitting their jobs last year to start the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum in downtown Milwaukee. They’ve already collected 4,000 bobbleheads of sports players, mascots, characters, regular and famous people and hope to have 10,000 by the time they open next year. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)

    In this April 16, 2015, photo, Phil Sklar, seated, and Brad Novak sit with some of the bobbleheads they have collected since quitting their jobs last year to start the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum in downtown Milwaukee. They’ve already collected 4,000 bobbleheads of sports players, mascots, characters, regular and famous people and hope to have 10,000 by the time they open next year. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this April 16, 2015, photo, Phil Sklar, left, and Brad Novak sit with some of the bobbleheads they have collected since quitting their jobs last year to start the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum in downtown Milwaukee. They’ve already collected 4,000 bobbleheads of sports players, mascots, characters, regular and famous people and hope to have 10,000 by the time they open next year. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)

    In this April 16, 2015, photo, Phil Sklar, left, and Brad Novak sit with some of the bobbleheads they have collected since quitting their jobs last year to start the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum in downtown Milwaukee. They’ve already collected 4,000 bobbleheads of sports players, mascots, characters, regular and famous people and hope to have 10,000 by the time they open next year. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this April 21, 2015,  photo, Phil Sklar scours a Kenosha, Wis., thrift story for bobbleheads. Sklar and Brad Novak quit their jobs last year to start the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum in downtown Milwaukee. They’ve already collected 4,000 bobbleheads of sports players, mascots, characters, regular and famous people and hope to have 10,000 by the time they open next year. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)

    In this April 21, 2015, photo, Phil Sklar scours a Kenosha, Wis., thrift story for bobbleheads. Sklar and Brad Novak quit their jobs last year to start the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum in downtown Milwaukee. They’ve already collected 4,000 bobbleheads of sports players, mascots, characters, regular and famous people and hope to have 10,000 by the time they open next year. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)  (The Associated Press)

The U.S. has museums dedicated to puppetry, vacuums and roller skating.

Now, two Milwaukee residents think Wisconsin is the perfect place to open the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum.

Phil Sklar and Brad Novak quit their jobs within the last year to start the museum and have already collected 4,000 bobbleheads of sports players, mascots, characters, and regular and famous people.

They hope to have 10,000 by the time they open next year.

Sklar says they want to be the go-to source for anything bobblehead-related.

A smaller bobblehead museum already exists at Marlins Park in Miami, but its 700 figurines are all baseball players, mascots and broadcasters.