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Will death sentence make Boston Marathon bomber Tsarnaev a martyr? Experts say it depends

  • FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014 courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sits in federal court in Boston for a final hearing before his trial begins in January. On Friday, May 15, 2015, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was sentenced to death by lethal injection for the 2013 Boston Marathon terror attack. Some analysts worry that Tsarnaev's eventual execution could inspire more attacks. But others, including Islamic leaders, say no: Tsarnaev was more of a lone wolf with a low profile among radical jihadists and no known links to the Islamic State group, al-Qaida or other influential terror organizations. (Jane Flavell Collins via AP, File)

    FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014 courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sits in federal court in Boston for a final hearing before his trial begins in January. On Friday, May 15, 2015, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was sentenced to death by lethal injection for the 2013 Boston Marathon terror attack. Some analysts worry that Tsarnaev's eventual execution could inspire more attacks. But others, including Islamic leaders, say no: Tsarnaev was more of a lone wolf with a low profile among radical jihadists and no known links to the Islamic State group, al-Qaida or other influential terror organizations. (Jane Flavell Collins via AP, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Boston Marathon bombing volunteer first responder Carlos Arredondo holds a "Boston Strong" banner as he leaves the Moakley Federal court with his wife Melida after the verdict in the penalty phase of the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Friday, May 15, 2015. The federal jury ruled that the 21-year-old Tsarnaev should be sentenced to death by lethal injection for his role in the deadly 2013 attack. Carlos is credited with saving the life of bombing survivor Jeff Bauman, who lost both of his legs in the blast. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    Boston Marathon bombing volunteer first responder Carlos Arredondo holds a "Boston Strong" banner as he leaves the Moakley Federal court with his wife Melida after the verdict in the penalty phase of the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Friday, May 15, 2015. The federal jury ruled that the 21-year-old Tsarnaev should be sentenced to death by lethal injection for his role in the deadly 2013 attack. Carlos is credited with saving the life of bombing survivor Jeff Bauman, who lost both of his legs in the blast. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)  (The Associated Press)

Does putting Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death make him a martyr for the cause?

Some analysts worry that Tsarnaev's eventual execution could inspire more attacks. But others, including Islamic leaders, say no: Tsarnaev was more of a lone wolf with a low profile among radical jihadists and no known links to the Islamic State group, al-Qaida or other influential terror organizations.

It will take years, possibly decades, of appeals before Tsarnaev — sentenced Friday by a federal jury in Boston to death by lethal injection — is executed.

Matthew Levitt, a former FBI counterterrorism intelligence analyst, says the death sentence will resonate differently around the world.

Levitt cautions that some jihadists probably already look at Tsarnaev as a martyr figure.