US

18 women told decades ago that babies died at St. Louis hospital now suspect they are alive

  • In this April 29, 2015 photo, Zella Jackson Price poses for a photo at her attorney’s office in Clayton, Mo. Eighteen black women who were told decades ago that their babies had died soon after birth at a St. Louis hospital now wonder if the infants were taken away by hospital officials to be raised by other families. The suspicions arose from the story of Price, who was 26 in 1965 when she gave birth at Homer G. Phillips Hospital and was told hours later that her daughter had died. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

    In this April 29, 2015 photo, Zella Jackson Price poses for a photo at her attorney’s office in Clayton, Mo. Eighteen black women who were told decades ago that their babies had died soon after birth at a St. Louis hospital now wonder if the infants were taken away by hospital officials to be raised by other families. The suspicions arose from the story of Price, who was 26 in 1965 when she gave birth at Homer G. Phillips Hospital and was told hours later that her daughter had died. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this April 29, 2015 photo, Zella Jackson Price poses for a photo at her attorney’s office in Clayton, Mo. Eighteen black women who were told decades ago that their babies had died soon after birth at a St. Louis hospital now wonder if the infants were taken away by hospital officials to be raised by other families. The suspicions arose from the story of Price, who was 26 in 1965 when she gave birth at Homer G. Phillips Hospital and was told hours later that her daughter had died. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

    In this April 29, 2015 photo, Zella Jackson Price poses for a photo at her attorney’s office in Clayton, Mo. Eighteen black women who were told decades ago that their babies had died soon after birth at a St. Louis hospital now wonder if the infants were taken away by hospital officials to be raised by other families. The suspicions arose from the story of Price, who was 26 in 1965 when she gave birth at Homer G. Phillips Hospital and was told hours later that her daughter had died. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)  (The Associated Press)

Eighteen black women told decades ago that their babies had died soon after birth at the old Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis are now questioning if the children weren't instead taken from them while very much alive.

A video that went viral last month shows Melanie Gilmore reuniting with her birth mother, Zella Jackson Price. DNA confirmed with near 100-percent certainty that the two are mother and daughter.

Price was 26 in 1965 when she gave birth, only to be told hours later that her daughter had died.

Media attention about the reunion led to other women reaching out to Price's attorney, Albert Watkins. He says city officials are trying to help investigate, but that no one can locate birth records from the hospital that closed in 1979.