ECONOMY

Amid talk of a recovered economy, hard-hit worker struggles to stay afloat

  • In this Jan. 2, 2015 photo, Joshua Thevenin, 29, packs boxes of unsold fireworks from inside a roadside tent Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Thevenin has worked as a newspaper salesman, fireworks vendor and tele-marketer. He lost his truck, missed his rent payment and had to go on food stamps. Like many workers barely holding on, he can't relate to President Obama's talk of an ''American resurgence.''  The fireworks were being sent back to the supplier. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    In this Jan. 2, 2015 photo, Joshua Thevenin, 29, packs boxes of unsold fireworks from inside a roadside tent Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Thevenin has worked as a newspaper salesman, fireworks vendor and tele-marketer. He lost his truck, missed his rent payment and had to go on food stamps. Like many workers barely holding on, he can't relate to President Obama's talk of an ''American resurgence.'' The fireworks were being sent back to the supplier. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Jan. 2, 2015 photo, Joshua Thevenin, 29, packs boxes of unsold fireworks from inside a roadside tent Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Thevenin has worked as a newspaper salesman, fireworks vendor and tele-marketer. He lost his truck, missed his rent payment and had to go on food stamps. Like many workers barely holding on, he can't relate to President Obama's talk of an ''American resurgence.''  The fireworks were being sent back to the supplier. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    In this Jan. 2, 2015 photo, Joshua Thevenin, 29, packs boxes of unsold fireworks from inside a roadside tent Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Thevenin has worked as a newspaper salesman, fireworks vendor and tele-marketer. He lost his truck, missed his rent payment and had to go on food stamps. Like many workers barely holding on, he can't relate to President Obama's talk of an ''American resurgence.'' The fireworks were being sent back to the supplier. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)  (The Associated Press)

Joshua Thevenin has been a newspaper salesman, fireworks vendor and tele-marketer in the last month. He's one of the millions of seasonal and temporary workers wondering if the recovery from the Great Recession is actually happening.

Lately, everyone from economists to President Barack Obama in his State of the Union are bullish on the economy.

But those like Thevenin, who live in the economy's shadows, know it's difficult to turn the page, much less begin a new chapter when you can't find full-time work.

The nation's unemployment rate is currently 5.6 percent. An alternative measure of unemployment, which includes people who work part-time but want full-time work, and those who recently stopped searching for jobs, is at 11.2 percent.