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2 veteran balloon pilots waiting for window to launch from Japan for record-breaking attempt

  • A model of the Two Eagles ballooning capsule is on display at the Anderson Abruzzo International Balloon Museum in Albuquerque, N.M., on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. The Two Eagles team has set up a mission control center at the museum and plans to launch its helium-filled balloon from the coast of southern Japan and head toward North America in hopes of breaking a pair of major ballooning records. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

    A model of the Two Eagles ballooning capsule is on display at the Anderson Abruzzo International Balloon Museum in Albuquerque, N.M., on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. The Two Eagles team has set up a mission control center at the museum and plans to launch its helium-filled balloon from the coast of southern Japan and head toward North America in hopes of breaking a pair of major ballooning records. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this Oct. 8, 2014 file photo, Albuquerque pilot Troy Bradley announces plans to fly across the Pacific Ocean with fellow pilot Leonid Tiukhtyaev of Russia as part of an effort to break a pair of long-distance and duration records that have stood for more than three decades, during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M. A patch of rough weather over the Pacific Ocean has forced the two veteran pilots  to delay the launch of their helium-filled balloon. Bradley of the U.S. and colleague Leonid Tiukhtyaev of Russia had planned to lift off from Saga, Japan. While flying conditions were just about perfect between Japan and Hawaii, forecasts called for deteriorating weather after that, which could hamper the record attempt and put the pilots in danger. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)

    FILE- In this Oct. 8, 2014 file photo, Albuquerque pilot Troy Bradley announces plans to fly across the Pacific Ocean with fellow pilot Leonid Tiukhtyaev of Russia as part of an effort to break a pair of long-distance and duration records that have stood for more than three decades, during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M. A patch of rough weather over the Pacific Ocean has forced the two veteran pilots to delay the launch of their helium-filled balloon. Bradley of the U.S. and colleague Leonid Tiukhtyaev of Russia had planned to lift off from Saga, Japan. While flying conditions were just about perfect between Japan and Hawaii, forecasts called for deteriorating weather after that, which could hamper the record attempt and put the pilots in danger. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry, right, and Steven Shope, director of the Two Eagles ballooning command center provide an update on launch plans during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M., on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. The international Two Eagles team plans to launch from the coast of southern Japan and head toward North America in hopes of breaking a pair of major ballooning records. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

    Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry, right, and Steven Shope, director of the Two Eagles ballooning command center provide an update on launch plans during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M., on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. The international Two Eagles team plans to launch from the coast of southern Japan and head toward North America in hopes of breaking a pair of major ballooning records. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)  (The Associated Press)

A patch of rough weather over the Pacific Ocean has forced two veteran pilots trying to break a pair of records to delay the launch of their helium-filled balloon.

Albuquerque pilot Troy Bradley and colleague Leonid Tiukhtyaev of Russia planned to lift off from Saga, Japan.

Their team at mission control in Albuquerque said Thursday the pilots do not want to compromise their safety and are watching for a break in the weather.

The pilots are aiming for the shores of North America, an attempt that puts them on course to break the ballooning distance record of 5,208 miles.

They're also looking to break the flight-duration record set in 1978 when Ben Abruzzo, Maxie Anderson and Larry Newman made the first trans-Atlantic balloon flight.