US

Marathon bombing suspect's lawyers invoke Oklahoma City case in arguments to have trial moved

  • In this still images from aerial video provided by WHDH-TV in Boston, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center wearing an orange jumpsuit, is transferred between vehicles in Devins, Mass., following his hearing in federal court Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with carrying out the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted.   (AP Photo/WHDH-TV Boston) NO ONLINE, PRINT OR BROADCAST USE MASSACHUSETTS. MANDATORY CREDIT.

    In this still images from aerial video provided by WHDH-TV in Boston, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center wearing an orange jumpsuit, is transferred between vehicles in Devins, Mass., following his hearing in federal court Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with carrying out the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/WHDH-TV Boston) NO ONLINE, PRINT OR BROADCAST USE MASSACHUSETTS. MANDATORY CREDIT.  (The Associated Press)

  • In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is depicted sitting in federal court in Boston Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, for a final hearing before his trial begins in January. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted.  (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)

    In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is depicted sitting in federal court in Boston Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, for a final hearing before his trial begins in January. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)  (The Associated Press)

Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) are again drawing parallels between the media coverage of their client's case to the coverage received by Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in an effort to have the trial moved out of Massachusetts.

In a filing Monday, defense attorneys wrote that because "the crimes charged inflicted actual injury on the entire local population" and "greater Boston, was itself, a victim," the case is similar to the McVeigh case.

McVeigh's 1997 trial was moved to Denver.

Monday's motion was in response to the prosecution's opposition to the defense's change-of-venue request.

A judge rejected Tsarnaev's first request in September to move the trial.

Jury selection in Tsarnaev's trial is scheduled to begin Jan. 5. He has pleaded not guilty.