US

Police altering policies and procedures after heated nationwide reaction to recent killings

  • FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2014, file photo, New York Police Department Officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference in New York. Police departments across the country are altering policies and procedures to assuage concerns about police conduct and to protect their own officers. In New York, they'll make greater use of stun guns; and body cameras are becoming more common in all departments. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2014, file photo, New York Police Department Officer Joshua Jones wears a VieVu body camera on his chest during a news conference in New York. Police departments across the country are altering policies and procedures to assuage concerns about police conduct and to protect their own officers. In New York, they'll make greater use of stun guns; and body cameras are becoming more common in all departments. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2014, file photo, New York Police Department Sgt. Joseph Freer holds a body camera during a news conference while Mayor Bill de Blasio listens, in New York. Police departments across the country are altering policies and procedures to assuage concerns about police conduct and to protect their own officers. In New York, they'll make greater use of stun guns; and body cameras are becoming more common in all departments. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2014, file photo, New York Police Department Sgt. Joseph Freer holds a body camera during a news conference while Mayor Bill de Blasio listens, in New York. Police departments across the country are altering policies and procedures to assuage concerns about police conduct and to protect their own officers. In New York, they'll make greater use of stun guns; and body cameras are becoming more common in all departments. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2014, file photo, Cleveland police watch demonstrators block Public Square in the city during a protest over the weekend police shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice. In cities and states nationwide, police departments are already altering policies and procedures to temper concerns about police conduct in the aftermath of recent cases of black males dying at the hands of white officers. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)

    FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2014, file photo, Cleveland police watch demonstrators block Public Square in the city during a protest over the weekend police shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice. In cities and states nationwide, police departments are already altering policies and procedures to temper concerns about police conduct in the aftermath of recent cases of black males dying at the hands of white officers. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)  (The Associated Press)

With tensions running high over the killings of blacks by police, departments around the country are changing policies and procedures.

They are trying to curb the use of deadly force, ease public distrust and protect officers from retaliation.

New York City, for example, plans to issue stun guns to hundreds more officers.

The Milwaukee department is making crisis-intervention training mandatory.

And in Akron, Ohio, police have begun working in pairs on all shifts for their own safety.