MILITARY

Feinstein says torture report is troubling record of CIA tactics but a step to restore values

  • Dec. 9, 2014: This frame grab from video, provided by Senate Television, shows Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaking on the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington. Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. is at center, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. is at right.

    Dec. 9, 2014: This frame grab from video, provided by Senate Television, shows Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaking on the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington. Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. is at center, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. is at right.  (AP Photo/Senate Television)

  • Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. is pursued by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she arrives to release a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. is pursued by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she arrives to release a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

  • Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. is surrounded by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she leaves the Senate chamber after releasing a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities. Feinstein branded the findings a "stain on the nation's history." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. is surrounded by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she leaves the Senate chamber after releasing a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities. Feinstein branded the findings a "stain on the nation's history." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee says the panel's report on brutal CIA interrogation practices used after the 9/11 terror attacks is a troubling record of a stain on America's history.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein says the CIA interrogation techniques used on at least 119 people in some cases amounted to torture.

The California Democrat says that releasing the Senate committee's report on those interrogation tactics is an important step in restoring American values.

Addressing concerns that the release of the report could add to turmoil in the world, Feinstein said the report is too important to leave on the shelf.