MILITARY

CIA mistreated detainees, misrepresented intelligence, Senate probe of interrogations finds

  • Senate Intelligence Committee member, Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, defends the panel's planned release of a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, during a TV news show interview on Capitol Hill in Washington.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Senate Intelligence Committee member, Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, defends the panel's planned release of a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, during a TV news show interview on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

  • Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who's poised to become chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, after he joined Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. to endorse the release of a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. Some Republican leaders objected to the report's release and challenged its contention that harsh tactics didn't work, but McCain, tortured in Vietnam as a prisoner of war, welcomed the report and endorsed its findings. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who's poised to become chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, after he joined Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. to endorse the release of a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. Some Republican leaders objected to the report's release and challenged its contention that harsh tactics didn't work, but McCain, tortured in Vietnam as a prisoner of war, welcomed the report and endorsed its findings. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this March 3, 2005 file photo, a workman slides a dustmop over the floor at the Central Intelligence Agency headquarters in Langley, Va. Senate investigators have delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogation practices after the 9/11 attacks, accusing the agency of inflicting pain and suffering on prisoners with tactics that went well beyond legal limits. The torture report released Tuesday by the Senate Intelligence Committee says the CIA deceived the nation with its insistence that the harsh interrogation tactics had saved lives. It says those claims are unsubstantiated by the CIA's own records. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    FILE - In this March 3, 2005 file photo, a workman slides a dustmop over the floor at the Central Intelligence Agency headquarters in Langley, Va. Senate investigators have delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogation practices after the 9/11 attacks, accusing the agency of inflicting pain and suffering on prisoners with tactics that went well beyond legal limits. The torture report released Tuesday by the Senate Intelligence Committee says the CIA deceived the nation with its insistence that the harsh interrogation tactics had saved lives. It says those claims are unsubstantiated by the CIA's own records. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

Senate investigators have delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogation practices after the 9/11 attacks, accusing the agency of inflicting pain and suffering on prisoners with tactics that went well beyond legal limits.

The torture report released Tuesday by the Senate Intelligence Committee says the CIA deceived the nation with its insistence that the harsh interrogation tactics had saved lives. It says those claims are unsubstantiated by the CIA's own records.

The 500-page report represents the executive summary and conclusions from a still-classified 6,700-page full investigation.