Menu
Home

Crime & Courts

Alabama hostage standoff enters Day 7 as authorities try to create safe environment

 

Authorities in a close-knit Alabama community say they're trying to create a safe environment for everyone involved as they try to negotiate for the release of a boy being held hostage in an underground bunker for almost seven days.

Authorities say 65-year-old Jimmy Lee Dykes, a decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, gunned down a school bus driver last week and then abducted a 5-year-old boy from the bus, taking him to the bunker on his rural property. 

“Based on our discussions he feels like he has a story that is important to him although it’s very complex," Dale County Sheriff Wally Olson told reporters Monday.

The FBI said in a statement Sunday that authorities continue to have an open line of communication with Dykes. The little boy requested Cheez-Its and a red Hot Wheels car, both of which were delivered to the bunker, a separate statement said. Authorities had said they also were delivering medicine and other comfort items, and that Dykes was making the child as comfortable as possible. Olson added Monday that most communications with Dykes happen during the daytime.

Olson wouldn’t say if authorities have spoken with the child or if they can hear the boy, but Olson said it is believed he is doing OK.

Residents of the town are preparing to send the boy birthday cards, as he will turn six later this week, the Dothan Eagle reports.

Fliers imploring people to pray for the little boy were stuck onto the chain-link fence outside of the Midland City Elementary School, where he is enrolled. The fence also has been adorned with black, white, and red ribbons. Residents have gathered for candlelight vigils on a nightly basis to pray for him.

On Sunday, more than 500 people paid final tribute to the driver that was killed, 66-year-old Charles Albert Poland Jr., hailing him as a hero for protecting the other children on the bus.

Poland is now "an angel who is watching over" the little boy, said Dale County School Superintendent Donny Bynum, who read letters written by three students who had ridden on Poland's bus. "You didn't deserve to die but you died knowing you kept everyone safe," one child wrote.

Outside the funeral, school buses from several counties lined the funeral procession route. The buses had black ribbons tied to their side mirrors.

Dykes grew up in the Dothan area. Mel Adams, a Midland City Council member who owns the lot where reporters are gathered, said he has known Dykes since they were ages 3 and 4.

He said Dykes has a sister and a brother, but that he is estranged from his family.

Adams said he didn't know what caused the falling-out, but that he knew Dykes "had told part of his family to go to hell."

Dykes, also described as a loner who railed against the government, lives up a dirt road outside this tiny hamlet north of Dothan in the southeast corner of the state. His home is just off the main road north to the state capital of Montgomery, about 80 miles away.

Government records and interviews with neighbors indicate that Dykes grew up in the Dothan area and joined the Navy in Midland City, serving on active duty from 1964 to 1969. His record shows several awards, including the Vietnam Service Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. During his service, Dykes was trained in aviation maintenance.

At some point after his time in the Navy, Dykes lived in Florida, where he worked as a surveyor and a long-haul truck driver. It's unclear how long he stayed there.

He had some scrapes with the law there, including a 1995 arrest for improper exhibition of a weapon. The misdemeanor was dismissed. He also was arrested for marijuana possession in 2000.

Dykes returned to Alabama about two years ago, moving onto the rural tract about 100 yards from his nearest neighbors, Michael Creel and his father, Greg.

"He said he lived in Florida and had hurricanes hit. He wanted someplace he could go down in and be safe," Creel said. Authorities say the bunker is about 6 feet by 8 feet, and the only entrance is a trap door at the top.

Neighbors described Dykes as a man who once beat a dog to death with a lead pipe, threatened to shoot children for setting foot on his property, and patrolled his yard at night with a flashlight and a firearm. Michael Creel said Dykes had an adult daughter, but the two lost touch years ago.

The Dykes property has a white trailer which, according to Creel, Dykes said he bought from FEMA after it was used to house evacuees from Hurricane Katrina. The property also has a steel shipping container -- like those on container ships -- in which Dykes stores tools and supplies.

Next to the container is the underground bunker where authorities say Dykes is holed up with the 5-year-old. Neighbors say that the bunker has a pipe so Dykes could hear people coming near his driveway. Authorities have been using the ventilation pipe to communicate with him.

Michael Creel said Dykes kept to himself and listened a lot to conservative talk radio.

"He was very into what's going on with the nation and the politics and all the laws being made. The things he didn't agree with, he would ventilate," he said.

James Arrington, police chief of the neighboring town of Pinckard, put it differently.

"He's against the government, starting with Obama on down," he said.

Morris Dees of Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, a group that tracks hate crimes, said Dykes was not on the group's radar.

Although the fatal shootings in December at a school in Newtown, Conn., are still on everyone's mind, Dees said he doesn't think Dykes was trying to be a copycat.

"Probably not. He had a whole bus load full of kids, and he could have walked up there and shot the whole crowd of them," he said.

"I think he's just a really angry and bitter guy with some anger management issues," Dees said. "He is just against everything -- the government and his neighbors."

The mother of the 5-year-old boy is 'hanging on by a thread,' said a local politician who visited the woman.

State Rep. Steve Clouse, who represents the Midland City area, said the mother told him that the boy has Asperger's syndrome as well as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD.

Residents are praying for the safe return of the boy.

"The community is real concerned," said Fred McNab, mayor of Pinckard, Ala. "You can tell by the food that's been carried over there to the church. It's just devastating. We want it to come to a resolution. We want to save that little child."

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Bank Rates

Loan Type Graph Rate +/- Last Week
30 Y Fixed Graph 4.07% dw 4.28%  
15 Y Fixed Graph 3.18% dw 3.26%  
30 Y Fixed Jumbo Graph 4.50% dw 4.53%  
5/1 ARM Graph 3.36% dw 3.43%  
5/1 Jumbo ARM Graph 3.69% up 3.56%  
Loan Type Graph Rate +/- Last Week
$30K HELOC Graph 4.36% -- 4.36%  
$50K HELOC Graph 4.06% -- 4.06%  
$30K Loan Graph 5.08% up 5.07%  
$50K Loan Graph 4.51% -- 4.51%  
$75K Loan Graph 4.51% -- 4.51%  
Loan Type Graph Rate +/- Last Week
36 M New Graph 2.93% up 2.92%  
36 M Used Graph 3.47% up 3.46%  
48 M New Graph 3.21% -- 3.21%  
48 M Used Graph 2.98% -- 2.98%  
60 M New Graph 3.23% -- 3.23%  
Loan Type Graph Yield +/- Last Week
6 month Graph 0.34% dw 0.35%  
1 yr Graph 0.66% -- 0.66%  
5 yr Graph 1.34% dw 1.35%