Innovation

Verizon is testing a drone that would let you keep cell service during a natural disaster

File photo: The logo of Dow Jones Industrial Average stock market index listed company Verizon is seen at a retail store in San Diego, California April 21, 2016. (REUTERS/Mike Blake )

File photo: The logo of Dow Jones Industrial Average stock market index listed company Verizon is seen at a retail store in San Diego, California April 21, 2016. (REUTERS/Mike Blake )

Verizon is continuing to expand how it utilizes new forms of technology to keep its network up and running during a severe weather event or another disaster.

Earlier this week, the New York-based telecom giant tested a long endurance drone with a 17-foot wingspan that could provide wireless coverage, using a "flying cell site."

The drone, piloted by  American Aerospace Technologies, was tested at Woodbine Municipal Airport in Woodbine, New Jersey.

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Below is a video of the drone taking off:

 

 “This new test builds upon our leadership in conducting the first successful demonstration in the U.S. for providing aerial coverage from a long-endurance medium altitude aircraft with AATI in Cape May last October,” said Christopher Desmond, Verizon Network in a statement.

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The testing was done via a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA) issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to Cape May County and could be used in county, state and federal situations to help emergency responders.