This is a partial transcript from "The O'Reilly Factor," June 27, 2007, that has been edited for clarity.

BILL O'REILLY, HOST: "Personal story" segment tonight. As you know, most celebrities in Hollywood are liberal. The culture out there almost demands a political correctness exemplified by people like George Clooney and Susan Sarandon.

Some actors have even told me they can lose jobs if they espouse conservative beliefs. Actor Bruce Willis, however, openly admits he voted for President Bush. And that has been a topic of conversation in his promotion of his film "Die Hard." I talked with him yesterday.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

O'REILLY: What they all want to know, they being the miserable media, is why you're more conservative than George Clooney. And they want to trap you into saying something bad about the war in Iraq, President Bush, Bill O'Reilly or any - you know that. You know the game they're trying to play.

BRUCE WILLIS, STAR OF "LIVE FREE OR DIE HARD": I do. I know that I have just as many contrary opinions about everything. And I have just as many liberal ideas as I have conservative ideas. And I argue with myself.

O'REILLY: But you voted for Bush, so you're the devil.

WILLIS: Well, no one really is supposed to know who you vote for, are they?

O'REILLY: I think People magazine spilled it, didn't they? I think they did.

WILLIS: I actually let People magazine come in the booth with me.

O'REILLY: Were you in there with Drew Barrymore, too? Was she voting with you? That's another thing.

WILLIS: No that was at a party at a hotel.

O'REILLY: All right. But they want to trap you into saying something bad.

WILLIS: You're keeping up though. Difficult. Difficult. More so, I think you can kind of get me in a magazine article. Because they get me wound up.

O'REILLY: Why does it drive them crazy that you may a little bit more conservative than Sean Penn?

WILLIS: I do have contrary opinions about it. You know, small government, yes. Less taxes, yes. Less government intrusion, yes.

O'REILLY: But here is where you're making a mistake. You go on Letterman and you make fun of Al Gore. How could you?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

WILLIS: I got the idea from Al Gore's big film, the documentary he did, "An Inconvenient Truth." Did you see it?

DAVID LETTERMAN, HOST, CBS'S "LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN": Yes, I have seen it.

"Inconvenient Truth," thought provoking.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WILLIS: They just don't have a sense of humor about it. I thought it was hilarious.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

LETTERMAN: What is the name of the film that you'll be doing that's like the Al Gore film?

WILLIS: It's a working title. I think I'm going to call it "An Unappealing Hunch."

LETTERMAN: "An Unappealing Hunch?”

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: Did you not make fun of the former vice president?

WILLIS: I shook his hand and told him it was a great film I saw.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

AL GORE, FORMER VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNTIED STATES: Temperature increases are taking place all over the world, and that's causing stronger storms.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: You did make fun of Al Gore. And I said, "Hey, I admire this guy. He's going into the devil's den, Letterman.” You saw me on Letterman.

WILLIS: Didn't see it.

O'REILLY: You didn't see it?

WILLIS: No, I don't watch that TV.

O'REILLY: You don't watch that TV?

WILLIS: No.

O'REILLY: It was pretty intense.

WILLIS: Did you get into it?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

LETTERMAN: Terrorism now is a far more — it's white hot. Where previous to the disruption in Iraq it was a fact of life. It was a gruesome fact of life. But now it's become a damn intramural sport.

O'REILLY: Hold it. I think it was pretty white hot on 9/11 when 3,000 people were slaughtered in the streets of the city. What you are doing is making a mistake of oversimplifying a very complicated complication.

LETTERMAN: Oh, I'm over simplifying it?

O'REILLY: Yes, you are.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: You go in there and you make fun of Gore, and he yuks it up with you. He didn't challenge you.

WILLIS: I make fun of everybody. I make fun of myself more than anything. But thank you for watching. Glad you saw it.

O'REILLY: Isn't it annoying to sit where you are right now and have people like me ask me questions when you have done so much of it in the last two weeks?

WILLIS: You're a smart guy, you know? I like talking to you.

O'REILLY: Bit how annoying is it to be asked about your love life incessantly?

WILLIS: I was hoping you wouldn't. You can ask me.

O'REILLY: With all due respect, I don't care about your love life.

WILLIS: I'm not asked every single time. And less than annoying because I know what my choices are now.

O'REILLY: Do you accept it?

WILLIS: I just laugh and I just go, "I'm not going to tell you."

O'REILLY: Now the end of the interview I'm going to give you a clear shot. Why should people spend $10 to see a 52-year-old guy save the world again? "Live Free and Die Hard?" Go.

WILLIS: Do you go to amusement parks?

O'REILLY: I do occasionally. With little kids.

WILLIS: Do you like roller coasters?

O'REILLY: Yes, yes.

WILLIS: Same thing. It's just a visual roller-coaster ride.

O'REILLY: Is it worth ten bucks?

WILLIS: It's worth 20 bucks.

O'REILLY: Twenty bucks, so take a date?

WILLIS: Go twice. No, go twice and get the ticket sale numbers up.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Jeez, you killed a helicopter with a car.

WILLIS: I was out of bullets.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: We appreciate you coming in and talking to us.

WILLIS: Thank you. Always a pleasure. I do check your show out from time to time.

O'REILLY: I appreciate that.

WILLIS: That's one of the few things I do watch.

O'REILLY: And that's why you're as astute as you are.

WILLIS: Not so astute.

O'REILLY: Bruce Willis everybody.

WILLIS: Thanks, buddy.

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