NFL

Monday's Sports in Brief

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

GRAPEVINE, Texas (AP) The Big 12 Conference has decided against expansion from its current 10 schools after three months of analyzing, vetting and interviewing possible new members.

The announcement came after a six-hour meeting with the conference's university presidents and Commissioner Bob Bowlsby.

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Oklahoma president David Boren said the decision was unanimous and no specific schools were discussed or voted on during the meeting.

Bowlsby said his only recommendation to the board was to bring the expansion process to an end. He said that while the conference could one day re-open the subject, expansion is now off the agenda.

PRO FOOTBALL

LAS VEGAS (AP) - Nevada's governor signed a bill clearing the way for a Las Vegas stadium that could be home to the Raiders, although NFL owners still need to approve the team's move from Oakland before Sin City becomes a football town.

Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval and Raiders owner Mark Davis joined hardhat-wearing construction workers and mask-wearing Raiders fans for the ceremony at UNLV, whose football team would also use the 65,000-seat domed stadium. Cheerleaders shook pompoms and a marching band launched into ''Viva Las Vegas'' after Sandoval inked the deal.

Nevada lawmakers narrowly approved a deal in a special session last week that increases hotel taxes in the Las Vegas area to raise $750 million for a stadium and more than $400 million to expand and upgrade the Las Vegas Convention Center. In raw dollars, it's the largest public contribution ever toward an NFL stadium, although the public's share of the total costs - 39 percent - is on par with stadiums in other similarly sized cities.

OLYMPICS

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) - Thousands of people joined Olympic sprinter Tyson Gay at a candlelight vigil on a Kentucky high school track honoring Gay's 15-year-old daughter, who was fatally shot over the weekend.

Gay stood on the track at Lexington's Lafayette High School where he and daughter Trinity excelled and he thanked people for showing support after the girl's death early Sunday after gunfire erupted outside a restaurant in that city. The teen's mother, Shoshana Boyd, also was present amid the crowd honoring her memory.

Many in the crowd wore pink and purple - Gay's favorite colors - with some holding balloons of those same hues that were later released into the air. Several pairs of track spikes hung from a fence along with a baton that said In Memory of Trinity.

Three men charged in connection with the shooting pleaded not guilty Monday and face an Oct. 25 court date. The three appeared via video before Fayette County, Kentucky, District Court Judge T. Bruce Bell.

BASEBALL

TORONTO (AP) - An Ontario judge quashed a last-minute effort to attempt to bar the Cleveland Indians from using their team name and ''Chief Wahoo'' logo during playoff games in Toronto.

The legal challenge by indigenous activist Douglas Cardinal came hours before the team played the Blue Jays in Game 3 of the AL Championship Series.

The long-standing logo, which appears on some team caps and jerseys, depicts a grinning, red-faced cartoon with a feather headband.

Ontario Superior Court Justice Tom McEwen dismissed Cardinal's application and said he would give his reasons at a later date.

Monique Jilesen, the lawyer for Cardinal, earlier told McEwen that the game could be played with spring training uniforms that don't carry the name or ''Chief Wahoo'' logo.

TENNIS

LONDON (AP) --Nick Kyrgios will miss the rest of the season after being suspended by the men's tour and fined an additional $25,000 for ''tanking'' a match and insulting fans in the mercurial Australian's latest run-in with tennis authorities.

The ATP said Kyrgios was sanctioned for ''conduct contrary to the integrity of the game'' following an investigation into his behavior during a second-round loss to German qualifier Mischa Zverev last week at the Shanghai Masters.

Kyrgios gave little effort during the 6-3, 6-1 defeat, even patting easy serves over the net and turning away before his opponent's serve had crossed the net.

The 21-year-old Australian had already been fined a total of $16,500 for failing to give a full effort, unsportsmanlike conduct and verbal abuse of a spectator.

The ATP said that, in addition to the extra $25,000 fine, Kyrgios was handed an eight-week suspension lasting through Jan. 15 - a day before the start of the Australian Open, the year's first Grand Slam tournament.