The Rams are moving back to Los Angeles, maybe with company.

The San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders might end up staying put, although the leadership of both teams didn't come close to making that commitment Tuesday night. Or one of them could be headed to L.A., too.

A long day of votes and re-votes ended with 30 of 32 NFL owners approving Rams owner Stan Kroenke's ambitious plan to move his team from St. Louis to the site of the old Hollywood Park racetrack in Inglewood, California, about 10 miles from downtown LA. The Chargers have a yearlong option to join the Rams, followed by the Raiders if the San Diego franchise declines.

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The Raiders and Chargers had a competing proposal to share a new stadium in nearby Carson, but neither option got the 24 votes needed for approval. After another negotiating session in the afternoon, Kroenke's $1.8 billion project prevailed.

The decision ends the NFL's 21-year absence from the nation's second-largest media market.

TRACK AND FIELD

PARIS (AP) Six years before the IAAF banned Russia, track and field's governing body knew of doping so out of control it feared Russian athletes could die from abuse of blood-boosting drugs and transfusions, and officials considered collaborating with Russians to hide the full extent of the cheating before the 2012 London Olympics, according to internal documents obtained by The Associated Press.

When the massive scandal of state-sponsored doping and cover-ups in Russia finally erupted with full force in 2015, IAAF leaders acted as though blindsided. ''This has been a shameful wake-up call,'' Sebastian Coe, the British Olympian and newly elected president of the International Association of Athletics Federations, said.

But in 2009, as a sophisticated new blood-testing program was launched, IAAF tests were already providing shocking insight into the scale and gravity of Russian doping, according to a six-year span of emails, letters and reports the AP received from a person intimately involved in the workings of the IAAF's anti-doping program. The person requested anonymity because he wasn't given permission to release the documents.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) - Jaysean Paige scored 26 points, Devin Williams had 17 points and 12 rebounds, and No. 11 West Virginia beat top-ranked Kansas 74-63 on Tuesday night.

West Virginia (15-1, 4-0 Big 12) is off to its best start since 1982, when it started 24-1.

Perry Ellis scored 21 points for Kansas (14-2, 3-1). The Jayhawks committed a season-high 22 turnovers, shot 42 percent for the game and was held to its lowest point total of the season.

West Virginia fans stormed the court and sang John Denver's ''Country Roads'' after the Mountaineers' first win over a top-ranked team in 33 years.

With snowy conditions and traffic gridlock outside, Kansas arrived at the WVU Coliseum from their nearby hotel only an hour before the game with the help of a police escort.

It didn't get any easier for the Jayhawks on the court.

They are the fourth No. 1 to lose this season joining North Carolina, Kentucky and Michigan State.

DEATHS

HOUSTON (AP) - Hall of Famer Monte Irvin, a power-hitting outfielder who starred for the New York Giants in the 1950s in a career abbreviated by major league baseball's exclusion of black players, has died. He was 96.

The Hall of Fame said Irvin died Monday night of natural causes at his Houston home.

Irvin was 30 when he joined the Giants in 1949, two years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier. Irvin spent seven of his eight big league seasons with the Giants and one year with the Chicago Cubs in 1956. A native of Haleburg, Alabama, Irvin played in the Negro, Mexican and Puerto Rican leagues during his 20s.

Irvin batted .300 or more three times with a high of .329 in 1953. He finished with a career average of .293 with 99 homers and 443 RBIs, numbers that would have surely been far higher if not for the game's racial segregation.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Former Butler basketball star Andrew Smith died Tuesday after a two-year battle with cancer. He was 25.

Butler athletic director Barry Collier spoke with Smith's family before issuing a joint statement with university President James Danko.

On Sunday, Smith's wife, Samantha, posted a blog item saying doctors had told her that ''death was imminent.''

The Indiana native played on both of Butler's national runner-up teams and finished his career with 1,147 points and 648 rebounds.

He was diagnosed with an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma early in 2014. Last November, the 6-foot-11 basketball player had a bone marrow transplant. Three weeks later, Smith's wife wrote that his body rejected had it.

Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens, the former Butler coach, skipped his team's game in Chicago last week to visit Smith.

MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - A new baseball stadium in Hartford, the first major development in decades for the city's depressed north end, has been plagued by cost overruns, theft of building materials and construction delays.

Now, city officials say there is no way the $55 million, 9,000-seat minor league ballpark can be ready for opening day in April.

The Eastern League on Tuesday revamped its schedule to send the Double-A Hartford Yard Goats on the road for at least their first 17 games while city officials and developers work to shore up a project aimed at attracting fans from the wealthy suburbs that surround Connecticut's hard-luck capital city.

I. Charles Mathews, a former deputy mayor who runs the Hartford Stadium Authority, said it's too important a project not to fix.

Matthews said Mayor Luke Bronin will announce a plan within the next two days that would allow the team to play in the city ''sometime in 2016.''