White House

Greg Gutfeld: Obama slams Fox News (and rings the division bell, for the last time)

Obama Iran

In a recent interview in that reprehensible wad of trash called Rolling Stone, President Obama pinpointed why the Democrats lost the election. He blamed it on Fox News.

He initially blamed his own party for its inability to connect with voters, but then he couldn't help himself. He did what he's done in the past when faced with denial or defeat: He targeted my place of employment.

Yes, his party sucks for losing, he says. But then he adds:

“Part of it is Fox News in every bar and restaurant in big chunks of the country.”

So, where to begin?

President Obama points fingers

 

First, let's call BS on this observation. If Barack Obama actually traveled the United States, he'd laugh at his own words. It's true that "big chunks" watch Fox News, but they don't have it on in their bars and restaurants, because those who are not leftists are usually not outwardly political. They have no desire to enforce their views on you. 

And perhaps they're used to keeping their views to themselves because people like Obama often mock them for having them. Trump's outgoingness may have changed this, but for the most part, the average non-liberal would rather talk pets than politics.

President Obama is a victim of the very disease that he accuses others of having: divisideria. In the Rolling Stone interview, he accuses Fox News and others of lying to foment division. That’s ironic, given that he's saying these things in Rolling Stone, the rag that peddled a massive lie (the UVA rape hoax) that ruined lives, and the same rag that put the Boston Bomber in heroic pose on its cover. You can't get a better mix of deceit and divisiveness than that.

For the left, it's always been the reverse. For them, the personal is always political, and they have no choice but to infect every arena in life with their strident opinions. Whether it's in the work cafeteria, at Thanksgiving dinner or at a play date with assorted brats … if you're a strong, dedicated progressive, every moment in life is simply an opportunity for proclaiming evidence of your heroic, sensitive belief system. 

Those of us who aren't liberals have no such reflex. When I'm among friends or strangers and politics comes up, I generally find a way to subvert or deviate from debate. I tell a joke. I say something stupid. I comment on my assorted body aches. It's essentially what I do on The Five.

True, as you enter the political season, this changes. People talked more politics in the back half of 2016, because that's when this subject's Super Bowl hits. People were talking Trump, because it was no different from talking about the next heavyweight champion, or a leading NASCAR driver. It's not political, it's just the season for it. It’s a topic for friendly or pointless conversation to pass time while ordering a sandwich.

But because Obama is a progressive, and because he’s surrounded by progressives, he projects their sense of political urgency and identity onto his political adversaries. He assumes we're all just like him, only in reverse.

But we aren't, and he can't see it, because he is a victim of the very disease that he accuses others of having: divisideria. In the Rolling Stone interview, he accuses Fox News and others of lying to foment division. That’s ironic, given that he's saying these things in Rolling Stone, the rag that peddled a massive lie (the UVA rape hoax) that ruined lives, and the same rag that put the Boston Bomber in heroic pose on its cover. You can't get a better mix of deceit and divisiveness than that.

The bottom line: The division began decades ago, when the left made politics a measure of your morality. (It’s no surprise it sprang up when Rolling Stone did, too.). If you weren't like them, you were immoral. You were not simply wrong, as the saying goes, you were evil — a point made often by Charles Krauthammer and Dennis Prager. This began after World War II, when young Americans had the time to turn politics into an all-consuming hobby of emotional activity. 

No one on the right ever pulled this kind of stuff on the left. True, some held on to bad ideas, but some on the left did, too. We just assumed they were wrong. They saw us as damned. Or as Hillary said, irredeemable. That paved the way for her excruciating loss. You can't win over people you just sentenced to a life of being deplorable.

This narrow, highly destructive sensibility exists still, even after Trump's beatdown. Comedians, singers and assorted talking heads continue to crap on Trump voters, reducing them to some braying, mindless, bigoted mob. But the more they do this, the more Trump supporters they create. Their simplistic, single-minded arrogance reveals the debilitating irrelevance they feel when the country no longer listens to their whine.

Oh, yes … in the good old days, it used to be that you could call someone a bigot, a sexist or simply evil — and it mattered. But the left called it all too much, abusing their power, so it's no longer believable. It's as if a superhero had only one single gift (call it "bigot-smearing"), and Trump arrived with the kryptonite. 

So you're left with a President Obama — a smart, gifted man — ending his tenure bitterly chatting to a pathetic, marginal magazine about a network he believes gave the country President-elect Trump. He's lost the plot. All Trump did was galvanize and organize a group of people tired of being villain-shamed by the arrogant and the elite. The fact that this group happened to watch Fox News is simply a correlation, not a cause. 

But by blaming Fox News, it at least helps the outgoing president achieve one thing: not having to blame himself.

Greg Gutfeld currently serves as host of FOX News Channel's (FNC) The Greg Gutfeld Show (Saturdays 10-11PM/ET) and co-host of The Five (weekdays 9-10PM/ET). He joined the network in 2007 as a contributor. Click here for more information on Greg Gutfeld