• And now some fresh pickings from the Political Grapevine...

    Big Love

    As Carl Cameron mentioned earlier Montana Democratic Governor Brian Schweitzer says Mitt Romney's family came from a polygamy commune in Mexico which is true.

    Romney's father was born in Mexico into a community of Mormons where some had more than one wife.

    However, neither Mitt Romney's father nor grandfather practiced polygamy. It was outlawed in the United States in 1890.

    What is also true is that President Obama has polygamists in his family tree.

    President Obama's great grandfather had five wives.

    His grandfather had at least four.

    And President Obama's father never divorced his first wife before marrying his second Stanley Ann Dunham who later filed for divorce.

    Obama [senior] married a third time before reuniting with his first wife.

    From contrasting dog stories, to comparing polygamy connections, Grapevine notes, if this week is any indication this could be a very long general election.

    Biden-isms

    Vice President Joe Biden has a reputation for using some off-the-wall statements to get his point across.

    And Thursday night was no exception.

    The pool report from a Phoenix fundraiser reads -- quote -- "Obama knew that some actions were going to be unpopular, such as the financial-sector bailout. 'That would be like legalizing rattlesnakes in the lobbies in hotels in Arizona' Biden quipped."

    Arizona Republican Senator John McCain responded via twitter -- asking "What does that mean??"

    No explanation yet.

    What's In a Name?

    And finally, a tiny village in Austria is voting on whether to change its name because city signs keep getting stolen and English-speakers keep snickering.

    The reason, town's name is pronounced Foo-king, however, it is spelled like the vulgar curse word.

    The mayor is less-than-pleased that tourists descend on the town to take pictures with the signs and make the village into a joke.

    Residents insist there's nothing profane about the centuries-old name.