Riley on May press conference: “This was not Twitter Trump. This was President Trump.”

The Wall Street Journal’s Jason Riley told viewers Friday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that President Donald Trump “was in fine form” at his first press conference as president today.

“This was not Twitter Trump. This was President Trump,” Riley said.

The press conference was a joint appearance with visiting British Prime Minister Theresa May. Riley noted that Trump took a more measured tone than usual.

“He was careful with his words. Very measured even when he got a couple of aggressive questions from some foreign media outlets,” commented Riley, adding, “I think we’ll have to see more of this if he wants a successful presidency but today I think he got the job done.”

Juan Williams discusses Trump tweets on Rep. John Lewis

On “Special Report with Bret Baier” Monday, Fox News Contributor Juan Williams discussed President-elect Donald Trump’s Twitter reaction to Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), who said in an interview with NBC that he doesn’t see Trump as a “legitimate President.”

“I think a lot of people, specifically people who know Civil Rights history, but I would say in particular black Americans of a certain age are just turned out, just think, ‘What is he saying? You can't say that about this guy,’” said Williams.

Trump took to Twitter the day after Congressman Lewis’ comments aired, saying in part that Lewis is “All talk, talk, talk - no action or results. Sad!” This was seen by critics as an untimely attack against a Civil Rights leader, just days before the federal holiday celebrating Martin Luther King Jr.

Williams also said the visit by Martin Luther King III to Trump tower on Monday was not a demonstration of reaching out.  

“[Trump] didn't take any questions…retreating into the elevator,” said Williams. “I hope he does more on Inauguration Day.”

Goldberg on Obamacare Repeal: “This is a very difficult position that the Republicans are in”

Fox News Contributor and National Review Senior Editor Jonah Goldberg said Wednesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that despite repeated promises to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act under the new 115th congress, “this is a very difficult position that the Republicans are in.”

Vice President-elect Gov. Mike Pence (R-IN) took to Capitol Hill on Wednesday to meet with congressional Republicans on the first full workday for the new Congress. After meeting with the House Republican Conference, Pence told reporters  “the American people have spoken.  They want to see us repeal and replace Obamacare, and today, my message to members of Congress is that we are going to be in the promise-keeping business, and the first order of business is to keep our promise to repeal Obamacare and replace it.”

Meanwhile, House Speaker Paul Ryan noted that after repealing Obamacare, as they work to implement a replacement plan House Republicans “want to make sure as we give relief to people through Obamacare, we do it in transition that doesn't pull the rug out from anybody  during that transition period.”

But even as the Vice President and congressional Republicans reiterated their pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare, Goldberg noted that doing so may not prove as simple as it sounds: “a lot of Obamacare passed with 60 votes, so you can't get rid of those parts through reconciliation.

“You can't keep all of the popular parts of Obamacare, which Donald Trump promises to do, and still call it repeal, it's something else. And lastly, because of Obamacare's own internal flaws, it's sort of like a suicidal dying patient and the Republicans are leaping in to be the doctor of record for the patient, and that's a real political problem for them. They can make it die faster, but they can't save it and they can't get a replacement for it very soon either.”

Krauthammer on Schumer pronouncement America can’t afford a Twitter presidency: “Sore loser”

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that new Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer’s pronouncement that America “can’t afford a Twitter presidency” is mostly baseless.

“Sore loser,” Krauthammer said. “The tweets are working. I mean, if they weren’t, they wouldn’t be using them… Trump has used [Twitter] on North Korea, he’s used it on Ford, General Motors… and it works.”

Krauthammer went on to say that while Twitter has proven to be an effective mode of communication for the President-elect, Trump may not find it as useful after he is sworn in as president.

“I think when he's in office, it'll be a little more problematic, because people will be presuming policy out of this,” he said, concluding, “It's hard to be either detailed or specific enough in a tweet to actually make coherent policy.”

Krauthammer: Obama’s environmental plan “egregious”

Charles Krauthammer said Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier”  that President Obama’s plan to ban offshore drilling in parts of the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans is “egregious” and reveals the fact that the White House is trying to “nail everything to the floor so it can’t be moved” before Donald Trump takes over.

“Of course it can be moved,” said Krathammer. “The idea that because we're not going to drill the oil or natural gas is not going to be produced is ridiculous and it's going to end up being produced in Nigeria or places all over the world where the environmental standards are infinitely less than they are in the  U.S.”

President Obama invoked a 1953 law -- the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act – which gives him the authority to act unilaterally and declare a permanent drilling ban from Virginia to Maine on the Atlantic and along much of Alaska’s coast.

Krauthammer added this move will not allow us to compete with foreign countries saying, “the Chinese are opening a coal fired plant every week. It’s not going to stop. What we don’t do they’re going to do and all we’re doing is exporting jobs, exporting the waste and exporting the danger.”

Stoddard on Obama’s Syria comments: ‘It was so painful for him’

RealClearPolitics associate editor A.B. Stoddard said Friday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that she was moved by President Obama’s comments at his annual end-of-the-year press conference on the massacre of civilians in Syria

“I just thought it was very poignant to hear President Obama use phrases like, ‘We were not successful,’ and, ‘I feel responsible,’” she said. “He was so heavy with responsibility, and it was so painful for him.”

Stoddard explained that the president felt there were no easy choices in Syria, and that he believed it would be too much to ask Americans, who already were in the midst of two wars, to invade that country militarily and rescue its people.

“It was a very painful discussion about how there are no options, even for Donald Trump,” she said, concluding, “[President Obama’s remarks] set up for all of us going forward the lack of choices there are at this point, and how much Donald Trump will be boxed in trying to get out of the mess in Syria.

Krauthammer on Democrats vowing to delay Trump Cabinet Confirmations: 'Revenge is not a good strategy for the Democrats'

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Tuesday on "Special Report with Bret Baier"  that if the Democrats want to hold up Trump's Cabinet confirmations as payback "they will suffer from that for 8 years."  Democrats are vowing to give Trump's picks the "Garland Treatment" after Obama's pick for the Supreme court, Merrick Garland, was held up.

Krauthammer warned the democrats of the optics of playing politics.  "Revenge is not a good strategy for democrats.  The one thing they don't want to be tagged with immediately is obstructionism."  Krauthammer added "this is going to look like naked partisanship and obstruction for its own sake."

When President Barack Obama entered the oval office congress approved 8 of his cabinet members without delay.  Krauthammer said "if these guys are going to stand around and do procedural stuff that you just show on television is going to look ridiculous."  While Krauthammer understands why you would hold up someone if you think they are extreme or unqualified, he told democrats  they shouldn't do it for revenge.  

Krauthammer on Trump’s conversation with Taiwan: ‘The Chinese are extremely sensitive’

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said Friday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that a telephone conversation between President-elect Trump and the Taiwanese president was not only politically incorrect, but it could have consequences for the United States’ relationship with China.

“The Chinese are extremely sensitive about these nuances in diplomacy. They've been at it for four thousand years, and the rules were laid down by Kissinger and Nixon when they made the opening, and it was that we'd be allies of Taiwan, but we would have to observe certain rules… that Taiwan is part of China,” Krauthammer said, adding, “Once you have communications with the president of the U.S. direct with the president of Taiwan, then you are impinging on that.”

Krauthammer went on to say that the Chinese can exert power when they feel they’re being wronged.

“The Chinese, when they get upset, can do things. Like take over an island here or there, or tear up an agreement, or start threatening, or do other things that could cause a crisis. I don't think that this is going to cause one, but when he ascends to office, Trump is going to have to be briefed on stuff like this,” he said, concluding that a diplomatic misstep, particularly in the Middle East could cause a “real rupture.”

Goldberg: Enormous Moral Hazard in Trump Carrier Deal

Jonah Goldberg told viewers Wednesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that president-elect Donald Trump reaching a deal with Carrier to keep jobs in Indiana is “brilliant politically.” Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday that he would make an announcement “concerning Carrier A.C. staying in Indianapolis.” 
Conservative syndicated columnist Jonah Goldberg warned that while convincing Carrier to  keep 1,000 jobs in US is a “big win for Trump politically,” it can also be a “moral hazard.” Goldberg explained that because of president-elect’s actions, “white house now can be baited into these kinds of tax giveaways and corporate welfare” to save few jobs.
Jonah Goldberg declared that despite some drawbacks, Donald Trump’s handling of Carrier is “not all that objectionable.” Goldberg said at the end of the day, Carrier deal is “great politics.”

Krauthammer on cabinet nominees: “Trump wants to get stuff done”

Charles Krauthammer told viewers Tuesday on “Special Report with Bret Baier” that when it comes to the significance of President-Elect Donald Trump’s choices for cabinet positions, the picks show that “Trump wants to get stuff done.”

“He doesn’t care if he creates an argument for democrats to say ‘you’re hypocritical about Wall Street,’” Krauthammer added. “He cares about results.”

Krauthammer held up Georgia Congressman Tom Price – Trump’s selection for Health and Human Services Secretary - as an example.

“He is the perfect man if you want to dismantle Obamacare,” he said. 

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A month into their terms, President Trump and VP Pence's roles come into sharper focus.

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  • AB Stoddard @RealClearNews
  • Charles Krauthammer @krauthammer

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