Outbreaks

Top US turkey producer Minnesota finds fourth bird flu case, USDA says

Chickens sit in their enclosures at a poultry farm in Tepatitlan, in Jalisco state, July 4, 2012. An outbreak of avian flu in western Mexico has killed at least 870,000 poultry birds since its detection last month but poses no threat to humans, the agriculture ministry said on Monday. The H7N3 flu was detected in two municipalities in the state of Jalisco, Mexico's largest chicken farming region, and authorities have been working quickly to contain the outbreak, a statement from the ministry said.   REUTERS/Alejandro Acosta (MEXICO  - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS) - RTR34LUP

Chickens sit in their enclosures at a poultry farm in Tepatitlan, in Jalisco state, July 4, 2012. An outbreak of avian flu in western Mexico has killed at least 870,000 poultry birds since its detection last month but poses no threat to humans, the agriculture ministry said on Monday. The H7N3 flu was detected in two municipalities in the state of Jalisco, Mexico's largest chicken farming region, and authorities have been working quickly to contain the outbreak, a statement from the ministry said. REUTERS/Alejandro Acosta (MEXICO - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS) - RTR34LUP  (REUTERS/Alejandro Acosta)

Minnesota, the top U.S. turkey producing state, has found a fourth turkey flock to be infected with a virulent strain of avian flu, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Thursday. 

South Dakota has found its first infection of the H5N2 flu strain, which can kill a poultry flock within 48 hours, in turkeys, according to the agency.

Recent infections of avian flu in states stretching from Arkansas to Oregon have prompted overseas buyers to limit imports of U.S. poultry from companies such as Tyson Foods Inc, Pilgrim's Pride Corp and Sanderson Farms Inc.

No human infections of the virus have been detected, USDA said.