Warm milk and missing concrete: Mar-a-Lago cited for food violations, safety issues

An inspection of President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla. in November turned up some slightly unsettling information about the conditions of the “Winter White House.” 

The two main kitchens at Mar-a-Lago were cited for 15 food violations during a state inspection on Nov. 8, while the property’s on-site bed and breakfast was cited for two “high-priority lodging violations," the Miami Herald reported.

A subsequent inspection confirmed that Mar-a-Lago had taken the appropriate actions to correct these violations by Nov 17.

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Included among the food violations found in Mar-a-Lago’s kitchens on Nov. 8 were the improper storage and marking of foods, such as dairy stored at temperatures exceeding 41 degrees F (in this case, it was milk stored at 49 F), and hot dogs stored on the floor of a walk-in freezer, among others.

Corrective actions resolved many of these violations on-site, although some — like an employee improperly observing the hand-washing policy, and the storage of raw meat or poultry held at too high a temperature — were deemed “high priority” and required a follow-up inspection, which the facilities passed.

The club’s bed and breakfast, too, needed some updates before inspectors could give it clean marks.

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According to state records, which were listed by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, the building was cited for lacking smoke detectors that would adequately warn any hearing-impaired guests of danger, as well as a staircase that was missing enough concrete to pose safety risk. Both were deemed high priority, though not an “immediate threat to the public,” per the report.

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Trump entertained Japanese President Abe and his wife at Mar-a-Lago in Feb. 2017, shortly after a previous state inspection cited one of the kitchens for the intent to serve raw fish that had "not undergone proper parasite destruction."  (Reuters)

The lodging site underwent repairs and upgrades by Nov. 17, when a follow-up inspection turned up no violations.

The Herald pointed out that this isn’t the first time Mar-a-Lago was cited by state inspectors in 2017: In January of that year, the club was cited for several food violations, including the mishandling of fish that was intended to be eaten raw, but had “not undergone proper parasite destruction,” among others. The report listed that the site ultimately “met inspection standards” during the visit.

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Cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post and her husband built the Mar-a-Lago estate in 1920s. Trump purchased the property in 1985 for a reported $10 million.