Russian scientist who developed nerve agent Novichok says he was hit by a car

A Russian scientist who helped develop the nerve agent believed to have been used in the recent poisoning of an ex-spy and his daughter in Britain is now in the hospital himself after he was hit by a car on Tuesday.

Vladimir Uglev, who said in a BBC interview earlier this month he helped develop the nerve agent, novichok, was struck while crossing the street at his home in the southern Russian town of Anapa, he told Russian news website The Bell.

Uglev said he was at a pedestrian crossing and noticed a car was not slowing down. When he ran towards the sidewalk, the scientist said the vehicle "caught up" with him, forcing him to jump on the hood which broke the windshield of the car.

In this handout photo taken on May, 2011 by Russian chemical experts Vladimir Uglev poses for a photograph at an undisclosed location. Uglev told The Associated Press said he was the scientist who in 1975 first synthesized A-234 _ an odorless liquid deadlier than any other chemical weapons that existed at the time, that apparently turned up in an English town and nearly killed a former Russian spy and his daughter. (Vladimir Uglev via AP)

Vladimir Uglev said he helped develop the nerve agent that officials in the United Kingdom said was used to poison an ex-spy and his daughter.  (AP)

He is currently in stable condition at a hospital, with injuries to his head, arm and leg, according to the Moscow Times.

The scientist told the news outlet he knew the vehicle's 70-year-old driver, who was from the same town, and believed the whole incident was an accident.

RUSSIAN EX-SPY, DAUGHTER WERE POISONED WITH NERVE AGENT, CHEMICAL WATCHDOG CONFIRMS

Earlier this month, he told the BBC that ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia Skripal, probably survived the poisoning on March 4 because they received a small dose. He added the Skripals weren't the first victims on his conscience.

Sergei and Yulia Skripa were poisoned on March 4.  (AP)

"If I thought about it, I could probably count a dozen people who've been poisoned by our substances, in different circumstances, for example, at the military training ground," he said.

Britain has blamed the attack on Russia, triggering the expulsion of more than 150 Russian diplomats from western countries. Russia vehemently denies any involvement and has responded by expelling the same number of diplomats.

Fox News' Lucia Suarez and Kathleen Joyce contributed to this report.

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed