Germany's Jews advised not to wear skullcaps amid recent anti-Semitic attacks

Leaders of Germany’s Jewish community have advised against the wearing of religious skullcaps amid recent anti-Semitic attacks.

Josef Schuster, president of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, told Berlin public radio that Jews should be cautious in larger cities, the BBC reported.

"Defiantly showing your colors would in principle be the right way to go [to tackle anti-Semitism]," he said. "Nevertheless, I would advise individual people against showing themselves openly with a kippa in a big-city setting in Germany, and wear a baseball cap or something else to cover their head instead.”

Schuster similarly warned in 2015 not to wear the skullcaps in areas with large Muslim populations.

His recent comments came just before a “Berlin Wears Kippah" solidarity march Wednesday sparked by an anti-Semitic attack last week against two men wearing kippahs in the German capital.

One victim, Adam Armoush, 21, told German media that he is a non-Jewish Israeli from Haifa and wore the Kippah to prove a point to a friend that Berlin isn’t as hostile to the Jews as some believe, Haaretz reported.

The assailant reportedly shouted anti-Semitic abuse during the attack. The Berlin-based Jewish Forum for Democracy and Against Anti-Semitism shared the footage of the last week’s attack.

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Germany has been seeing increasing hostility toward the Jewish people, with numerous Jewish organizations alerting officials about the threats they face.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel slammed what she called “another form of anti-Semitism."

She told Israeli media that the Jewish community faces threats not only from far-right groups but also from some Muslim refugees.

The country has taken in nearly 1 million refugees, predominantly from Muslim countries, since the migrant crisis began in 2015.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Lukas Mikelionis is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @LukasMikelionis.