The Latest: Envoy says China understands Myanmar's efforts

The Latest on the violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state and the exodus of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims to Bangladesh (all times local):

11:50 a.m.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi says that Beijing "understands and supports Myanmar's efforts to maintain national stability."

Wang's comments, made in New York during a meeting with U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, came amid a surge in violence in Myanmar, with hundreds of thousands of Muslim Rohingyas fleeing their villages for safety in Bangladesh. Myanmar's government conducted what it called "clearance operations" after deadly insurgent attacks last month, but the refugees have said security forces and mobs carried out indiscriminate killings and arsons that burned out Rohingya enclaves in the predominantly Buddhist nation.

The comments were released Tuesday by the Chinese Foreign Ministry.

Wang also said that "China looks forward to the war falling silent as soon as possible, when innocents will no longer be hurt," adding that China would be providing emergency humanitarian assistance to Bangladesh to deal with the flood of refugees from Myanmar.

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11:20 a.m.

Rohingya Muslims who fled violence in Myanmar are rejecting leader Aung San Suu Kyi's claims that many members of their minority group are safe.

Suu Kyi said Tuesday that most Rohingya villages weren't hit by violence. She invited foreign diplomats gathered in the capital for her speech to visit villages that were unaffected.

In the Kutupalong refugee camp in nearby Bangladesh, Abdul Hafiz says Rohingya once trusted Suu Kyi more than the military that ruled before her for half a century. Now he calls Suu Kyi a "liar" and says Rohingya are suffering more than ever.

Hafiz was angered by the implication that Rohingya who were driven from their villages were themselves responsible. He said if that's true, Suu Kyi should give international journalists more access to their destroyed villages. If Rohingya are proven wrong, he says, "we will not mind if the world decides to kill us all by pushing us into the sea."

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10:30 a.m.

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi is defending her country against international criticism over an exodus of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims by saying most of their villages remain intact, and that it's important to understand why conflict did not break out everywhere.

The Nobel Peace laureate's global image has been damaged by violence since Rohingya insurgents attacked Myanmar security forces on Aug. 25. More than 400,000 Rohingya have fled their villages, many of which have been burned. The government has blamed the Rohingya themselves, but members of the persecuted minority have said soldiers and Buddhist mobs attacked them.

Suu Kyi told foreign diplomats gathered in Naypyitaw that "more than half" of Rohingya villages were not affected by the violence. She invited the diplomats with visit those villages so they could learn along with the government "why are they not at each other's throats in these particular areas."