Europe

Johnson says Britain still backs 2-state solution in Mideast

  • Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, right, shakes hands with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson during their meeting, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, right, shakes hands with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson during their meeting, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)  (The Associated Press)

  • Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson waves to journalists upon his arrival for a meeting with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

    Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson waves to journalists upon his arrival for a meeting with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)  (The Associated Press)

  • Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, right, talks with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson during their meeting, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, right, talks with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson during their meeting, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)  (The Associated Press)

Britain's foreign minister says his country remains firmly in favor of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Boris Johnson told reporters in the West Bank on Wednesday that his government is "committed" to that vision, saying that "we must not abandon that prospect."

He says there are obstacles to establishing an independent Palestinian state, including Israeli settlement construction. He also says peace must be reached between the parties, and not be imposed from the outside.

In a break from his predecessors, President Donald Trump has given mixed signals about whether the United States still supports a two-state solution. His election has emboldened Israeli hard-liners who oppose the establishment of a Palestinian state, while Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu recently has stopped short of endorsing the idea.