Europe

Europeans wonder if Trump will act on Pence's reassurances

  • United States Vice President Mike Pence, left and Turkey's Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, talk prior to their meeting during the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017.  America's commitment to NATO is "unwavering," Pence said Saturday, reassuring allies about the direction the Trump administration might take but leaving open questions about where Washington saw its relationship with the European Union and other international organizations.  (Prime Minister's Press Service, Pool Photo via AP)

    United States Vice President Mike Pence, left and Turkey's Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, talk prior to their meeting during the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. America's commitment to NATO is "unwavering," Pence said Saturday, reassuring allies about the direction the Trump administration might take but leaving open questions about where Washington saw its relationship with the European Union and other international organizations. (Prime Minister's Press Service, Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • United States Vice President Mike Pence, right, shakes hands with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin, left, as Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko looks on, centre, during the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017.  America's commitment to NATO is "unwavering," Pence said Saturday, reassuring allies about the direction the Trump administration might take but leaving open questions about where Washington saw its relationship with the European Union and other international organizations.  (Mykola Lazarenko/Presidential Press Service Pool Photo via AP)

    United States Vice President Mike Pence, right, shakes hands with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin, left, as Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko looks on, centre, during the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. America's commitment to NATO is "unwavering," Pence said Saturday, reassuring allies about the direction the Trump administration might take but leaving open questions about where Washington saw its relationship with the European Union and other international organizations. (Mykola Lazarenko/Presidential Press Service Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • United States Vice President Mike Pence, left and Turkey's Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, right, shake hands for the photographers prior to their meeting during the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017.  America's commitment to NATO is "unwavering," Pence said Saturday, reassuring allies about the direction the Trump administration might take but leaving open questions about where Washington saw its relationship with the European Union and other international organizations. (Prime Minister's Press Service, Pool Photo via AP)

    United States Vice President Mike Pence, left and Turkey's Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, right, shake hands for the photographers prior to their meeting during the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. America's commitment to NATO is "unwavering," Pence said Saturday, reassuring allies about the direction the Trump administration might take but leaving open questions about where Washington saw its relationship with the European Union and other international organizations. (Prime Minister's Press Service, Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Some European leaders remain skeptical that President Donald Trump's emissaries actually speak for the new American leader.

Vice President Mike Pence and the U.S. secretaries of state and defense are telling European allies in person that the U.S. will steadfastly support NATO and demand that Russia honor its commitments to end fighting in Ukraine.

The president of Poland, for one, says he's waiting for action from the Trump government.

European countries along Russia's border have been rattled by the prospect of deeper U.S.-Russia ties after Trump bucked the opinions of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other world leaders by suggesting that sanctions imposed on Russia over its intervention in Ukraine could be eased in exchange for a nuclear arms deal.