US

Carter: US to return Okinawa land to Japanese government

  • United States Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, second left, speaks to the media as Japanese Deputy Defense Minister Kenji Wakamiya, right, accompanies on the flight deck of the helicopter destroyer Izumo of Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. Carter's final swing across Asia as Pentagon chief shines a spotlight on tough issues to be inherited by his successor, from concern in Tokyo and Seoul about being forced to pay more for U.S. military protection to worry across the region about North Korea's nuclear ambitions. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    United States Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, second left, speaks to the media as Japanese Deputy Defense Minister Kenji Wakamiya, right, accompanies on the flight deck of the helicopter destroyer Izumo of Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. Carter's final swing across Asia as Pentagon chief shines a spotlight on tough issues to be inherited by his successor, from concern in Tokyo and Seoul about being forced to pay more for U.S. military protection to worry across the region about North Korea's nuclear ambitions. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)  (The Associated Press)

  • Self-Defense Forces personnel stand at the helicopter destroyer Izumo of Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) after the visit by U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. Carter's final swing across Asia as Pentagon chief shines a spotlight on tough issues to be inherited by his successor, from concern in Tokyo and Seoul about being forced to pay more for U.S. military protection to worry across the region about North Korea's nuclear ambitions. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Self-Defense Forces personnel stand at the helicopter destroyer Izumo of Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) after the visit by U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. Carter's final swing across Asia as Pentagon chief shines a spotlight on tough issues to be inherited by his successor, from concern in Tokyo and Seoul about being forced to pay more for U.S. military protection to worry across the region about North Korea's nuclear ambitions. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)  (The Associated Press)

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter says the U.S. will give back to the Japanese government nearly 10,000 acres of land on Okinawa that U.S. Marines use for jungle warfare training.

The giveback, to be completed by the end of this month, has been in the works for 20 years and is the largest by U.S. forces in Japan since 1972.

Carter announced the plan at a joint appearance with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.