MILITARY

HRW accuses Saudi-led coalition of war crimes in Yemen

  • This image made from video shows a radar site after a U.S. airstrike in Hodeida, Yemen on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. US-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles destroyed three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory on Yemen's Red Sea Coast early on Thursday, officials said, a retaliatory action that followed two incidents this week in which missiles were fired at US Navy ships. (AP Photo via AP video)

    This image made from video shows a radar site after a U.S. airstrike in Hodeida, Yemen on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. US-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles destroyed three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory on Yemen's Red Sea Coast early on Thursday, officials said, a retaliatory action that followed two incidents this week in which missiles were fired at US Navy ships. (AP Photo via AP video)  (The Associated Press)

  • This image made from video shows a radar site after a U.S. airstrike in Hodeida,Yemen on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. US-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles destroyed three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory on Yemen's Red Sea Coast early on Thursday, officials said, a retaliatory action that followed two incidents this week in which missiles were fired at US Navy ships. (AP Photo via AP video)

    This image made from video shows a radar site after a U.S. airstrike in Hodeida,Yemen on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. US-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles destroyed three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory on Yemen's Red Sea Coast early on Thursday, officials said, a retaliatory action that followed two incidents this week in which missiles were fired at US Navy ships. (AP Photo via AP video)  (The Associated Press)

  • Yemen's army spokesman Brigadier General Sharaf G. Loqman, left, speaks to a reporter during an interview with The Associated Press in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. U.S.-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles destroyed three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory on Yemen's Red Sea Coast early Thursday, officials said, a retaliatory action that followed two incidents this week in which missiles were fired at U.S. Navy ships. Loqman said that the army never targets ships outside the territorial waters and only those that enter the Yemeni waters come under attack. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

    Yemen's army spokesman Brigadier General Sharaf G. Loqman, left, speaks to a reporter during an interview with The Associated Press in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. U.S.-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles destroyed three coastal radar sites in Houthi-controlled territory on Yemen's Red Sea Coast early Thursday, officials said, a retaliatory action that followed two incidents this week in which missiles were fired at U.S. Navy ships. Loqman said that the army never targets ships outside the territorial waters and only those that enter the Yemeni waters come under attack. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)  (The Associated Press)

An international human rights group says that the Saudi-led coalition's bombing of a packed funeral in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, this week constitutes an apparent war crime and that the remnants of missiles found at the site of the attack showed that they were American made.

Human Rights Watch said Thursday that a disproportionate number of the victims were civilians when the coalition carried out two airstrikes on Saturday on the funeral, which top military and security officials had been expected to attend. Nearly 140 people were killed and over 600 were wounded.

An international investigation is needed into the "atrocity," said Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director for the rights group. She says the attack on the funeral joins a long list of abuses by the coalition.