GLOBAL ECONOMY

Unemployment rates for Latinos in the U.S. up in September

FILE - In this July 19, 2016, file photo, people fill out job applications at a job fair in Miami Lakes, Fla. Tepid income growth and shrinking opportunities for blue-collar workers have kept many Americans anxious about jobs and the economy, seven years after the Great Recession ended. The unemployment rate has fallen to a relatively low 4.9 percent. But many Americans are struggling to keep up with an economy that has been fundamentally transformed since the recession, and is very different from the one their parents experienced. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

FILE - In this July 19, 2016, file photo, people fill out job applications at a job fair in Miami Lakes, Fla. Tepid income growth and shrinking opportunities for blue-collar workers have kept many Americans anxious about jobs and the economy, seven years after the Great Recession ended. The unemployment rate has fallen to a relatively low 4.9 percent. But many Americans are struggling to keep up with an economy that has been fundamentally transformed since the recession, and is very different from the one their parents experienced. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)  (Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribu)

The unemployment rate jumped in September for Hispanic and Latino Americans, who lost work and missed out on broader national jobs gains.

The jobless rate for people of Hispanic and Latino ethnicity climbed to 6.4 percent, the highest level since November. It had stood at 5.6 percent in August.

At the same time, unemployment rates held steady for whites, ticked up for black Americans and fell for Asian Americans.

Americans without high school diplomas lost ground in the job market. Their unemployment rate rose to 8.5 percent, the highest level since May 2015.

Overall, U.S. employers added 156,000 jobs in September. The overall unemployment rate ticked up to 5 percent from 4.9 percent in August.

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The data for various demographic groups came from a survey of households that is part of the Labor Department's monthly jobs report.

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