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N.J. immigration detention center ordered to pay workers $4.8M in back pay

PHOENIX - APRIL 28:  Undocumented Mexican immigrants are photographed while being in-processed at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), center on April 28, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. Across Arizona, city police and county sheriffs' departments turn over detained immigrants to ICE, which deports them to their home countries. Last year ICE deported some 81,000 illegal immigrants from the state of Arizona alone, and with the passage of the state's new tough immigration enforcement law, the number of deportations could rise significantly.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX - APRIL 28: Undocumented Mexican immigrants are photographed while being in-processed at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), center on April 28, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. Across Arizona, city police and county sheriffs' departments turn over detained immigrants to ICE, which deports them to their home countries. Last year ICE deported some 81,000 illegal immigrants from the state of Arizona alone, and with the passage of the state's new tough immigration enforcement law, the number of deportations could rise significantly. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)  (2010 Getty Images)

More than 100 workers at a New Jersey immigration detention facility are receiving $4.8 million in back wages and benefits under a settlement between federal regulators, county officials and a company that ran the facility.

The U.S. Labor Department says in a statement dated Sept. 29 that Essex County and Community Education Center, Inc. paid workers at Delaney Hall Detention Facility in Newark lower wages than is legally required.

CEC provides re-entry and in-detention treatment services.

Federal regulators had said 122 "detention officers" who monitored immigrant detainees were wrongly classified as "operations counselors."

Detention officers made $30.97 an hour. Counselors made $11.29 an hour.

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CEC says it feels the employees worked under a collective bargaining agreement and didn't have the duties or skill sets of "detention officers."

County officials say they're happy an amicable resolution was reached.

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