The Latest on the signing of a historic peace deal in Colombia (all times local):

10:20 a.m

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is urging young Colombians to embrace the country's peace process for the sake of future generations.

At a round table in Cartagena, Colombia, Kerry spoke with former combatants who voluntarily left the guerrillas, land-mine victims and members of anti-rebel recruitment group.

Kerry told attendees that "anybody can pick up a gun, blow up things, hurt people," but it will not be about positive change. He said the United States is "very invested in your struggle for change."

The secretary of state is among a number of foreign dignitaries in Colombia to attend Monday's signing of a peace accord between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

Kerry said that the U.S., Norway and partner countries raised $105 million last week for de-mining the country over the next five years.

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9:15 a.m.

There's tight security and a festive mood in the air in the Colombian city of Cartagena as leftist guerrillas and the government are set to sign a historic peace deal.

More than 2,700 troops have been deployed to guarantee the security of 15 Latin American heads of state at Monday's ceremony.

U.N. Secretary-General ban Ki-moon and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry are also scheduled to witness the signing in the Caribbean city.

The peace accord is the product of four years of tough negotiations in Havana between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

The South American nation's five-decade conflict, partly fueled by the cocaine trade, has killed more than 220,000 people and driven 8 million from their homes.