Europe

Russia: Siberian vote could be annulled if fraud proven

  • People register to get ballot papers at a polling station during a parliamentary elections in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016. Russia's weekend parliament elections take place under new rules that in principle could bring genuine opposition into the national legislature. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

    People register to get ballot papers at a polling station during a parliamentary elections in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016. Russia's weekend parliament elections take place under new rules that in principle could bring genuine opposition into the national legislature. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)  (The Associated Press)

  • A man talks to election commission officials at a polling station during a parliamentary elections in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016. Russia's weekend parliament elections take place under new rules that in principle could bring genuine opposition into the national legislature. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

    A man talks to election commission officials at a polling station during a parliamentary elections in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016. Russia's weekend parliament elections take place under new rules that in principle could bring genuine opposition into the national legislature. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Russian army officer holding a ballot walks through military cadets lining up to get their ballots at a polling station during a parliamentary election in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016. Russia's governing party and its three largely cooperative opponents are expected to retain their positions in the national parliament, but new procedures for choosing the seats could affect their proportions. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

    A Russian army officer holding a ballot walks through military cadets lining up to get their ballots at a polling station during a parliamentary election in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016. Russia's governing party and its three largely cooperative opponents are expected to retain their positions in the national parliament, but new procedures for choosing the seats could affect their proportions. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)  (The Associated Press)

Russia's elections commission head says results from voting for parliament in a Siberian region could be annulled if allegations of vote fraud there are confirmed.

Ella Pamfilova's statement came Sunday as Russians cast ballots for the State Duma, the lower house of parliament.

The pro-Kremlin United Russia party is expected to retain its dominance and the three other largely cooperative parties in the current parliament are also expected to win seats.

Russian officials are concerned that widespread allegations of vote fraud could spark protests similar to the massive demonstrations after elections in 2011.

A candidate from the liberal Yabloko party in the Altai region of Siberia told state news agency Tass that young people were voting in the name of elderly people unlikely to come to polling stations.