Europe

Putin: Washington keeping cease-fire details secret

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to a journalist's question during a news conference after a CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States, former Soviet republics) summit in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

    Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to a journalist's question during a news conference after a CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States, former Soviet republics) summit in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov speak each other at a CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States, former Soviet republics) summit in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

    Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov speak each other at a CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States, former Soviet republics) summit in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to a journalist's question during a news conference after a CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States, former Soviet republics) summit in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

    Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to a journalist's question during a news conference after a CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States, former Soviet republics) summit in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Russian President Vladimir Putin is expressing frustration at Washington's refusal to publish the Syrian cease-fire deal reached with Russia, but says Moscow won't unilaterally release it.

"I don't really understand why we have to keep such an agreement closed," Putin was quoted as saying Saturday during a trip to Kyrgyzstan.

He suggested Washington's resistance stems from a hope to retain the combat potential of forces fighting the Syrian government.

"This comes from the problems the U.S. is facing on the Syrian track — they still cannot separate the so-called healthy part of the opposition from the half-criminal and terrorist elements," he said. "In my opinion, this comes from the desire to keep the combat potential in fighting the legitimate government of Bashar Assad. But this is a very dangerous route."