Europe

Britain's May seeks out new trading relations post-Brexit

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May talks to media with U.S. President Barack Obama after their bilateral meeting in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, alongside the G20. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    British Prime Minister Theresa May talks to media with U.S. President Barack Obama after their bilateral meeting in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, alongside the G20. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.S. President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister Theresa May talk to media after a bilateral meeting in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, alongside the G20. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    U.S. President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister Theresa May talk to media after a bilateral meeting in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, alongside the G20. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.S. President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister Theresa May shake hands at the conclusion of a news conference after their bilateral meeting in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, alongside the G20. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    U.S. President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister Theresa May shake hands at the conclusion of a news conference after their bilateral meeting in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, alongside the G20. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)  (The Associated Press)

British Prime Minister Theresa May says she intends to seize new trading opportunities for a Britain that has voted to leave the European Union, reiterating that "Brexit does indeed mean Brexit" and there will be "no attempt to get out of this."

In a joint news conference with President Barack Obama, the two leaders sought to downplay the impact of the British exit on their countries' relationship.

But Obama suggested that London would have to wait its turn before the United States prioritized a new, separate trade deal with a Britain outside the EU. Obama noted the U.S. remains focused on finishing trade deals with Asia-Pacific and the EU.

The president said he believed Britain's current priority was "figuring out what Brexit means with respect to Europe."