Europe

UK's May reassures China after nuclear power plant delay

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 20, 2016 file photo, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing street to attend her first Prime Ministers Questions at the House of Parliament in London. Prime Minister Theresa May is attempting to allay disquiet about her surprise delay to a Chinese-backed nuclear power plant by reassuring China's leader that Britain wants strong relations with Beijing. Foreign Office Minister Alok Sharma delivered a letter from May to President Xi Jinping during a visit to Beijing. May's office did not publish the letter, but said Tuesday, Aug. 16 it was about "reassuring the Chinese of our commitment to Anglo-Chinese relations." (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, file)

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 20, 2016 file photo, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing street to attend her first Prime Ministers Questions at the House of Parliament in London. Prime Minister Theresa May is attempting to allay disquiet about her surprise delay to a Chinese-backed nuclear power plant by reassuring China's leader that Britain wants strong relations with Beijing. Foreign Office Minister Alok Sharma delivered a letter from May to President Xi Jinping during a visit to Beijing. May's office did not publish the letter, but said Tuesday, Aug. 16 it was about "reassuring the Chinese of our commitment to Anglo-Chinese relations." (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, file)  (The Associated Press)

Prime Minister Theresa May is attempting to allay disquiet about her surprise delay to a Chinese-backed nuclear power plant by reassuring China's leader that Britain wants strong relations with Beijing.

Foreign Office Minister Alok Sharma delivered a letter from May to President Xi Jinping during a visit to Beijing.

May's office did not publish the letter, but said Tuesday it was about "reassuring the Chinese of our commitment to Anglo-Chinese relations."

China's ambassador to Britain, Liu Xiaoming, warned last week that relations were at a "crucial historical juncture" following the U.K. government's delaying of a decision on the Hinkley Point power plant.

May surprised the business world last month by announcing a review of the power project, financed by a Chinese nuclear power provider and French energy giant EDF.