Europe

Turkey's president reforms military after failed coup

  • Turkey President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gives a speech commemorating those killed and wounded during a failed July 15 military coup, in Ankara, Turkey, late Friday, July 29, 2016. The government crackdown in the coup's aftermath has strained Turkey's ties with key allies including the United States. (AP Photo/Kayhan Ozer Presidential Press Service, via AP Pool)

    Turkey President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gives a speech commemorating those killed and wounded during a failed July 15 military coup, in Ankara, Turkey, late Friday, July 29, 2016. The government crackdown in the coup's aftermath has strained Turkey's ties with key allies including the United States. (AP Photo/Kayhan Ozer Presidential Press Service, via AP Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • People take photos with their phones at the iconic Galata Tower, illuminated in Turkish flag colors, in Istanbul, Saturday, July 30, 2016. Dozens of staff at Turkey's highest court have been suspended from their jobs as part of the crackdown in the wake of a failed military coup, authorities said. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

    People take photos with their phones at the iconic Galata Tower, illuminated in Turkish flag colors, in Istanbul, Saturday, July 30, 2016. Dozens of staff at Turkey's highest court have been suspended from their jobs as part of the crackdown in the wake of a failed military coup, authorities said. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)  (The Associated Press)

  • People walk at Taksim square in central Istanbul, on Saturday, July 30, 2016. Dozens of staff at Turkey's highest court have been suspended from their jobs as part of the crackdown in the wake of a failed military coup, authorities said. Sixty-four personnel at the Constitutional Court were suspended until an assessment could be made on their possible links to the July 15 attempted coup, the court said in a statement. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

    People walk at Taksim square in central Istanbul, on Saturday, July 30, 2016. Dozens of staff at Turkey's highest court have been suspended from their jobs as part of the crackdown in the wake of a failed military coup, authorities said. Sixty-four personnel at the Constitutional Court were suspended until an assessment could be made on their possible links to the July 15 attempted coup, the court said in a statement. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)  (The Associated Press)

A new presidential decree has introduced sweeping reforms to Turkey's military in the wake of the failed coup in the country.

Sunday's decree gives the president and prime minister the authority to issue direct orders to the commanders of the army, air force and navy. It also shuts down military schools, establishes a new national defense university, puts the force commanders directly under the defense ministry and announces the discharge of 1,389 military personnel.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has launched a sweeping crackdown on those he accuses of being involved in the July 15 attempted coup.

In an interview with private A Haber television Saturday, Erdogan said he also wants to put the country's intelligence agency and the chief of general staff's headquarters under the presidency.